Clockwork Angels

SKU: 16861765620
Label:
Roadrunner Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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"Legendary rock band Rush have unveiled details of its highly anticipated 2012 album, Clockwork Angels. The recording of Clockwork Angels began with Grammy Award winner Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Deftones) who collaborated with the band on their 2007 studio album, Snakes and Arrows - and Rush co-producing. Lyrically, Clockwork Angels chronicles a young man's quest across a lavish and colorful world of steampunk and alchemy as he attempts to follow his dreams. The story features lost cities, pirates, anarchists, exotic carnival, and a rigid Watchmaker who imposes precision on every aspect of daily life. With more than 40 million records sold worldwide and countless sold-out tours, Rush - Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson, and Neil Peart - is not only one of the most inventive and compelling groups in rock history, but remains one of the most popular."

Product Review

Wed, 2012-06-20 17:28
Rate: 
0
The power & the musicianship is all there, but I think the record is lacking truly great songs. It starts out well with "Caravan" but go downhill from there.. I wish they could be less "formula" and more progressive again on their next album perhaps? A good record, but not awesome.
Mon, 2012-08-06 17:10
Rate: 
0
Simply Stated: THE BEST RECORD THAT I HAVE EVER HEARD!!!
You must login or register to post reviews.

Product Review

Wed, 2012-06-20 17:28
Rate: 
0
The power & the musicianship is all there, but I think the record is lacking truly great songs. It starts out well with "Caravan" but go downhill from there.. I wish they could be less "formula" and more progressive again on their next album perhaps? A good record, but not awesome.
Mon, 2012-08-06 17:10
Rate: 
0
Simply Stated: THE BEST RECORD THAT I HAVE EVER HEARD!!!
You must login or register to post reviews.
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