A Change Of Seasons

SKU: 7559-61842-2
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Metal/Hard Rock
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This was a long tune that was a staple of DT's early stage show but never recorded. They finally tracked it (when Derek Sherinian was in the band) and it may well be the most overtly prog thing they ever did. Comes with live bonus material recorded at the Marquee Club in which the band does a load of cover versions. Highly recommended.

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    $7.00
  • Long overdue album from one of the best bands in the prog metal genre and they deliver the goods.  With Damian Wilson out front it can't be bad - can it?  Threshold has shuffled vocalists over the years but there are constants - melodic based songs with stellar musicianship and more than enough complexity.  Always loved the keys in this band.  Highly recommended.
    $13.00
  • Second full length studio album from this British band finds them with new vocalist Ashe O'Hara replacing the great Dan Tompkins.  This shouldn't be inferred that O'Hara is any less a vocalist than Tompkins - he's excellent as well.While the core djent sound is there the band has moved a bit more into a prog rock direction.  In general its less metal and more rock.  O'Hara's vocals don't go in the screamo direction that a lot of djent bands prefer.  The instrumental parts are still stupifyingly crazy but crazy in a King Crimson meets Tool way.  I'm not sure what the djent metal community will think of this shift in course but I like this new direction.  The old was good - to my ears this is better.  Highly recommended.
    $9.00
  • In the summer of 2014 Nosound were invited to perform at an extraordinary festival - the Starmus Festival held at the Teide Observatory on the island of Tenerife. This unique international astronomy event brought together an array of musical talent including European opera legend Katerina Mina and the legendary Rick Wakeman plus leading figures in contemporary science (with talks from the likes of Brian May, Nobel Prize winners, cosmonauts and Professor Stephen Hawking).It was here that Nosound recorded Teide 2390. Performed and recorded at Starmus infront of an invited audience at an altitude of 2390m, the band played songs from their 2005 debut Sol29, 2008's Lightdark, 2009's A Sense Of Loss and their most recent album Afterthoughts (which Prog Magazine described as, "Extraordinary").Teide 2390 features an audio CD of the full 70 minute set. The DVD-A/V includes standard & HD both in stereo & 5.1 mixes:DVD: stereo 24/48 LPCM, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround, DTS 24/96 5.1 Surround plus a short film based on Nosound gig, including performances of In My Fears, Fading Silently, Places Remained, Kites, Cold Afterall, plus behind the scenes footage and pictures from the event.DVD Audio: 5.1 Surround 24/96 MLP lossless mixesThe CD/DVD is presented in a deluxe media book with 24 page colour booklet. 
    $16.00
  • The last studio album (at least for now) from KC. Personally I thought this was a big rebound from TCoL. The album crushes from beginning to end.
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  • Special edition that comes with the bonus NTSC DVD filmed on the band's 2005/2006 tours as well as video clips. Swedish power metal band that is to my surprise still kicking. The band is fronted by Johnny Lindqvist who has a hell of a set of pipes. The music has moved away from the Iron Maiden cookie cutter variety and incorporated more melodic and AOR elements.
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  • The band's second album. At this point the progressive elements were just starting to be displayed.  Remastered edition.
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  • EP from these Italian power metal kings.
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  • "Karnataka are survivors. Since their inception at the tail end of the 1990s, they have most definitely had their ups and downs: they found some success fairly rapidly, helped in no small part by a scorched earth gigging mentality and some fairly prestigious support slots with the likes of progressive rock favourites Porcupine Tree and the much-loved, oft-lamented All About Eve. By 2004, it seemed nothing could prevent the band’s ascent to progressive rock favourites, and larger venues started to beckon.Sadly, their upward trajectory ran abruptly aground when internal relationships fractured and the band went their separate ways. One of the chief songwriters, founder member Ian Jones, decided to keep the Karnataka flame burning, however, and assembled a new-look band. Critics and fans were divided about the reborn band, but Karnataka forged ahead, delivering several well-received tours and their most successful album to date, 2010’s The Gathering Light – but just as the album finally appeared, the band found itself short-staffed once more as various members elected to pursue other interests.The Gathering Light possessed more of a progressive rock influence than any of the band’s previous albums: opening with two instrumentals, and possessed of three further tracks that all clocked in at over ten minutes in length, its sprawling atmospherics housed a haunting, soulful but introspective record which felt like a side-step from the Karnataka of old. Life had thrown many obstacles at chief writer Jones, and the album reflected them all, as Jones and the band overcame adversity to deliver a bruised but unbowed album of survivor anthems. The band’s new album, Secrets Of Angels, however, overflows with confidence: it’s not so much bruised as bruising. Here the band sound truly re-energised, thrumming with barely suppressed vitality. The progressive rock influence has for the most part been dialled back substantially, only really surfacing significantly on the epic, closing title track; the result is a much more immediate and focused album with more immediately hooky and memorable songs.Secrets Of Angels is the band’s first studio album with a new line-up, and it’s a testament to Jones’ deep understanding of the music he’s making that the new look Karnataka are so evidently a force to be reckoned with. The renewed emergy and sense of purposes within the band is exemplified by opener ‘Road To Cairo’, which fuses Zeppelin’s ‘Kashmir’ with Jones’ fine ear for an anthemic chorus. Powered along by a relentless, powerful rhythm, it fair leaps out of the speakers, a sharp contrast with previous albums that tended to open far more gently. Incredibly, this energy level is maintained throughout the next four tracks with barely any let-up: ‘Because Of You’ opens as if it will be a gothic ballad, but soon delivers huge power chords, a dynamite vocal from vocalist Hayley Griffiths, making her first appearance – hopefully the first of many – on one of the band’s studio albums, and one of guitarist Enrico Pinna’s most outré solos to date, a cascading wail of rage and frustration that will pin you to the nearest wall. ‘Poison Ivy’ goes straight for the jugular, its chanted verses and soaring chorus underpinned by a crunching riff and elaborate orchestrations, a pattern followed by the instantly addictive ‘Forbidden Dreams’, a sprightly rocker with a hugely memorable chorus that is certain to become a sing-along favourite for fans.The album continues with ‘Borderline’, a track with two faces: after opening with another suitably gothic flourish, all wind and a tolling church bell, it reveals itself as a chugging riff-based rocker, with a grimly accusatory lyric; however, the mood is utterly transformed by the distinctly pop chorus. Catharsis and hope in the face of adversity is perhaps Karnataka’s bread and butter, and ‘Borderline’ is an almost perfect distillation of that duality. It’s followed by the highly dramatic ‘Fairytale Lies’, which is reminiscent of Within Temptation at their most balefully reflective, a glorious concoction of tumbling keys and a striking string arrangement, topped off by a lyric that is superb in its cynical acceptance of reality and Griffiths’ astonishing vocal, a masterclass in mood and atmosphere. Yet the mood lifts once again with the penultimate track, ‘Feels Like Home’, a pretty, touching ballad about discovering “the one” that happily avoids the trap many ballads fall into – the cardinal sin of over-sentimentality. The way it develops is compellingly cinematic: as the song goes on, more and more layers are added to the music and the vocal, as if the virtual camera is pulling slowly back to reveal more and more of the stage. It ends in a cascade of harmony vocals, like embers from a firework display drifting back down to earth, and is possibly one of the best ballads the band have ever delivered.After all this drama, it would take something very special indeed not to be anticlimactic, but the title track itself – all twenty minutes of it – is certainly not that. Karnataka have shown themselves to be masters of longer pieces before, never falling into the self-conscious prog trap of simply pasting together a bunch of disparate pieces of music and hoping for the best. Although this magnum opus is comprised of seven separately numbered and titled parts – count ‘em! – it somehow manages to feel organically grown rather than stitched together in a lab. In many ways, it’s the ultimate distillation of what the new-look Karnataka are all about: we have folky, Celtic sections featuring guest appearances from Nightwish’s Troy Donockley; delicate balladry; a pounding symphonic metal interlude, and some outright prog courtesy of penultimate section ‘In The Name Of God’, which opens like Marillion in their pomp and steadily dials up the intensity. The effect is almost total sensory overload, and it will likely take many listens to unlock all the detail, musically and lyrically. Any piece of this length has to end strongly, and happily Karnataka have saved their ace in the hole for the dying moments of the album, as everyone pulls out all the stops for the grand finale. Pinna delivers one of his most devastating solos; Donockley serves up a Uillean pipe solo to die for, and the rhythm section get stuck in as Cagri and the assembled string section provide a backdrop of dizzying beauty for Griffiths to deliver possibly her finest vocal to date. It’s unspeakably moving, a beautiful lament for the losers on the battlefields of life and love that will quite likely require more than one handkerchief.It feels wrong to call current vocalist Hayley Griffiths the “new vocalist”, since she’s been touring with the band since very early in 2012. With a background in large musical productions (Irish dance spectaculars Riverdance and Lord Of The Dance both feature in her quite extensive CV), fronting a rock band was something completely new for Griffiths, and it isn’t perhaps surprising that the first batch of dates she undertook with the band – where the live release New Light was recorded – saw her nailing the demanding vocal parts without breaking a sweat, but looking slightly self-conscious on stage. As anyone who has seen the band recently will attest, any inhibitions that Griffiths may once have had on stage are long since gone, and that confidence has found its way onto the album, where she delivers a flawless, powerful performance. From fiery rock vocals to the lofty, operatic extreme of her range, Griffiths is perfectly on point throughout, as at home with riff-based rockers like ‘Road to Cairo’ and ‘Poison Ivy’ as she is with the gothic balladry of ‘Fairytale Lies’. It’s a bravura showcase for a highly gifted performer, and it’s practically impossible to come away from hearing her in action here not having reached the conclusion that she is the perfect foil for the band. Powerfully charismatic, hugely versatile and technically magnificent, her vocals on the closing title track in particular shame many better known female rock vocalists.Çağrı Tozluoğlu, on keys, is a similarly impressive recruit. Eschewing the more traditional progressive rock influences of previous keysman Gonzalo Carrera, Tozluoğlu brings a welcome modernity to the band. His soloing is sparsely used, but when it does appear (as on ‘Poison Ivy’), it’s wonderfully fluid. Where Tozluoğlu excels is in his shaping of mood and his orchestrations: his epic approach to arrangement means that this is the biggest-sounding Karnataka album to date. The danger of dialling up the drama is that sonically the music is weighed down until it sounds overwrought, but Tozluoğlu knows exactly when a bit more is too much. Nowhere is this more evident than in the expansive title track, where the gradual crescendoes and sudden juddering launches into explosive instrumental sections are handled with a very fine hand. Even as the song builds more and more layers upon Tozluoğlu’s musical architecture, it never feels like drama for the sake of drama; it all feels natural, logical.Last of the new arrivals is the most recent one, French drummer Jimmy Pallagrosi, whose performance here is frankly the stuff of future legend. With all the energy of progressive legends like Mike Portnoy, Pallagrosi’s explosive playing lends the material added potency and urgency whilst anchoring it to earth, playing a key role in giving it real weight and momentum. His Bonham-esque voyages around his kit during ‘Road to Cairo’ are a joy to hear; at the same time, his restraint on some of the quieter pieces – such as ‘Fairytale Lies’ – demonstrates a keen musicality and a knowledge of where to leave space for the music to breathe. In a world seemingly filled with drummers who appear to treat every song as a drum solo, Pallagrosi’s keen sense of dynamics is both refreshing and exactly what the material needs. He is, in short, the right drummer at the right time.Secrets Of Angels is a triumph. Wonderfully melodic, hugely dramatic without being in any way corny, varied in feel yet somehow effortlessly cohesive, beautifully recorded and mixed, and very sympathetically mastered, it is fairly easily the best-sounding album the band have made. The material is fabulously strong, and managed to both tread new ground and sound like ‘classic’ Karnataka at the same time – no mean feat, especially with all the new blood involved in its writing. As the epic title track draws to a breathless close, the listener may find themselves exhausted – drained by an album that runs the full gamut of emotions and leaves no stone unturned in its quest to powerfully move anyone who takes the time to sit down with it and listen. Hands down, the band’s finest hour, and a validation of the belief and skills of the new-look band. The only difficulty Karnataka now face is how to top it." = Echoes And Dust
    $15.00
  • "Drop was the first fruit of Porcupine Tree drummer Gavin Harrison's collaboration with singer and extended range bass player 05Ric, and featured contributions from Robert Fripp, Dave Stewart and Gary Sanctuary.Nine carefully crafted songs combined with ground-breaking multi-layered guitars, vocal harmonies and rhythms.This is the 2013 Kscope edition of the duo's astonishing debut."
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  • A unique deluxe box edition of prog legends Nektar most critically acclaimed album Remember The Future - now with 3D graphics!  Limited edition box set of 1000 copies.A specially created 3D rendering of this iconic album cover brings the image to life using lenticular printing giving it added depth and animation - this will be a collector s item for years to come!Comes with a bonus disc of the famous Chipping Norton Studios session recorded live on March 27, 1974. --Official Press ReleaseProduct DescriptionDISC 11. Remember the Future, Pt. 12. Remember the Future, Pt. 2DISC 2Radio Edits1. Remember The Future2. Lonely Roads3. Let It GrowThe 1970 Boston Tapes4. New Day Dawning5. Do You Believe In Magic6. Candlelight7. Good Day8. The Life I've Been Leading9. Where Did You Go10. Sealed With A Kiss11. Our Love Will Last ForeverDISC 3Live At Chipping Norton Studios 19741. Desolation Valley2. Oops - Unidentified Flying Abstract3. Mundetango4. One Mile Red / The Ticket5. We Must Have Been Smashed6. Summer Breeze
    $39.00
  • Wolf People are an incredible ensemble from the UK.  They channel the late 60's/early 70's British sound.  Definitely psychedelic buzz from these guys.  Folk elements crop up that will remind you a little bit of Fairport Convention but the electric side dominates and it constantly reminds me of bands like The Groundhogs and High Tide - think TS McPhee and Tony Hill blazing away.  This is guitar oriented music that is completely immersed in THAT SOUND.  Killing solos through out.  Man I love this band!!!  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • Swedish power metal band that is to my surprise still kicking. The band is fronted by Johnny Lindqvist who has a hell of a set of pipes. The music has moved away from the Iron Maiden cookie cutter variety and incorporated more melodic and AOR elements.
    $11.00
  • Limited digipak edition with one bonus track."Fourteen years. Fourteen years have already passed, since Morten Veland departured from one of the most prominent and praised gothic metal acts of its time, Tristania, and decided to further develop and portray his talent and visions in Sirenia. If you are like me and have followed them since the beginning to the point where we are now, then this is definitely one of these moments when we realize how quickly time passes by, wouldn't you agree? What has happened in these fourteen years? An amazing debut At Sixes And Sevens, its noteworthy successor And An Elixir For Existence and a few albums, which divide the band's fan base: some more loved, other less, but all bearing the typical Sirenia characteristics. A few line-up changes happened in the course of the years as well, but since 2011 the band has been a steady quintet and I'm guessing the stability and energy between the band members has to do something with the fact that since 2011's The Enigma Of Life, which I consider to be the lowest point of Sirenia's repertoire, the band has again turned the page and decided, reaching a low point is something they should accept and – ascend. The recruit of Ailyn, who joined the band in 2008 as a lead female singer obviously was more than a good idea, because she is the longest running of all female vocalists who ever stood in front of the microphone of the band and has shared notable seven years with them. Speaking of sevens, whether it is a coincidence or not (and I do not believe in coincidences), that The Seventh Life Path is the band's seventh full length album and the sevens continuously appear in Veland's tracks – "Seven Sirens And A Silver Tear" (An Elixir For Existence), "Seven Keys And Nine Doors" (Nine Destinies And A Downfall), "The Seventh Summer" and "Sirens Of The Seven Seas" (both on The 13th Floor) and "Seven Widows Weep" (Perils Of The Deep Blue) - to go through them all, I am not sure. But it is a number of mystery and magic, a number which finds its place in fairy tales and legends as well as mythology and religion and the seventh Sirenia album is, believe it or not, just as mysterious and spellbound as the number.  Whilst the typical melodic, rhythmic and groovy guitar riffing, beautifully combined and enhanced by the use of choirs, powerful orchestrations, delightful piano melodies and stunning Ailyn's clean vocals, counterpoised by Morten's profound growls, still build the core of The Seventh Life Path, its beauty lies in incorporating various elements of different metal styles and thus its explorative, even a bit experimental and pompous nature. The opening intro track "Seti" is a nice ambient setter, which takes you on the darkest path and the frightening and threatening choirs let you know you are in for something big: something incredibly obscure, flamboyant and majestic. The compositions on The Seventh Life Path are yet again very dense and rich, as they ooze strange, strained, sharp, intense, wretched and venomous atmosphere and you get just that with the following "Serpent", a highly tenebrous and ghastly song, which emits a deranged and vile ambiance, a bit similar of what we already heard in Tristania's "Opus Relinque" or "Heretique" from their 1999 album Beyond The Veil. Not only musically, but a great part in building that sensations are Ailyn's graceful vocals and again she has proved she keeps evolving: she lightly shifts from sounding like insane witch, beautiful enchantress, raging fury or a fragile siren so effortlessly and with Morten's opposing growls they are creating the typical beauty and the beast play of vocals. Not only by using the two typical vocal techniques, which contradict each other, but because they are interacting as they are telling us a story and thus add a special, very dramatic and almost theatrical effect, which intensifies the sound to the maximum.Similarly, the grandiose epicenes is probably most notable in a more than eight minute lasting epopee "Sons Of The North", an incredible track, that pushes the sound of Sirenia even further by incorporating avant-garde metal features – when you come half-way along the song a mad intermezzo, with incredibly haunting atmosphere breaks the song’s dynamics and descends into a massive, twisted sensation and so it even heightens the sombre and asphyxiating ambient. "The Silver Eye" brings yet another surprise with its almost fast-paced and abrupt beginning, which really shows Sirenia peered themselves into far more aggressive realms, we were used to. On the other hand, The Seventh Life Path also offers some catchy and melodic tunes, for example in "Elixir", a song, which somehow flows in the vein of currently popular trancecore a wee bit and last but not least, delivers some very classical sirenian tunes, for instance in a ravishing and elegiac ballad "Tragedienne" or a classical gothic/symphonic tune, filled with typical Veland-ish guitars and powerful choirs in a bittersweet "Once My Light" and "Concealed Disdain".To be honest, I was a bit reserved with this album, simply because I had no idea what to expect, but I can honestly say this is not only an album for the devoted Sirenia fan base, but also for anyone looking a wonderful combination of prime gothic metal and symphonic metal grandeur. The Seventh Life Path was far more than I expected it to be, simply because it depicts a step further in Sirenia's sound and I had never even imagined they would go for exploring and expanding their well-established sound by going into more tense and intense waters, into even more complex and enhanced compositions and stygian atmosphere. With this release Veland has completely mastered his ability to perfectly equilibrate all those various elements and portray them into a whole different, so much more vigorous, ferocious and emotional manner; poured his entire soul into this work of art and perfected the interpretation of musical compositions and song-writing. The divine and darkened harmonies on this album result in an esoteric, edgy, mesmerizing and hellacious album, which at the same time offers a tremendous emotional burdened and at the same time story-telling aestheticism." - Terra Relicta
    $13.00