Blue Oyster Cult ($5 Special)

Legendary first album comes with 4 unreleased bonus tracks. Now available at a great price.

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:55
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I owned all the BOC Albums at one time, I replaced them on cd . Being raised on Long Island (Farmingdale) I remember them as (Great White underbelly) before they changed to BOC.. great debut album, (Secret Treaties) my favorite... great price,, get em.. Bob Ricci
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:55
Rate: 
0
I owned all the BOC Albums at one time, I replaced them on cd . Being raised on Long Island (Farmingdale) I remember them as (Great White underbelly) before they changed to BOC.. great debut album, (Secret Treaties) my favorite... great price,, get em.. Bob Ricci
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  • "What’s the first thing that pops into your head when you think of Italy? It will probably be the scenery, the beauty and the great food. For me it’s the same but I also think of great music as Italy has produced some great musicians and artists. So is the band featured in this review one of them? Only one way to find out so here we go it’s time for a review.The band in question is called BURNING BLACK, who is a quintet of Italian rockers from the Treviso part of Italy that formed in 2004. In 2008, their debut album, “Prisoners of Steel”, was unleashed upon the world showing what this new fresh European band could do and a year later they came back with their second album, “MechanicHell”, and now here in 2014, their third album, “Remission of Sin” is upon us.The album clocks in at roughly 49 minutes playtime with a total of 11 tracks that consist of nothing but pure bred Heavy Metal but the question is, does it play and sound like an album that belongs in that genre? Well when you first listen to it, it certainly has all the right ingredients needed for a great European Heavy Metal album and the more you listen, the more you start to realize that the ingredients are a part of a great recipe which results in good music.So to answer my earlier question, yes this does play and sound like an album that belongs in the Heavy Metal genre? Let’s start with the music which is crisp, clear, heavy, fast and loud just like a normal Heavy Metal album but sometimes that can be a good thing as there have been cases where the recipe has otherwise failed or not been as successful.Here that is far from being the case as you are treated to some pretty insane guitar riffs and some rather impressive vocals which yes at times may sound a bit hit and miss but overall it’s not really something to worry about it as it’s the performance which can often impress and come out on top over any little niggles you may find.The album has a total of nine vocal songs including “Flag of Rock”, “Mercenary of War”, “Soulless Stone” and “Far Away” to name a few along with two instrumentals which include the opening introduction track “Do Lung Bridge” and “Spaceman’s Theory” with the latter being a sweet little acoustic and electric guitar jam.So what do I think of the new album from BURNING BLACK? It comes as no surprise that this would sound good as it is from a European band after all but that said some European bands have released slightly mediocre material that is far from perfect and not as enjoyable as others. With the good European bands however, you get quality music and although some of them may have their little faults here and there, you enjoy them for what they are especially if it’s from a band you like or a band you’ve been a strong follower of. I am glad to say it’s the same here as despite any issues I may have addressed in this review, I was impressed overall with this album and I will definitely come back to it and listen to it again." - Metal Temple
    $15.00
  • Stunning reissue of the second album from Jacqueline Thibault aka Laurence Vanay.  To confuse issues more this was actually released under the band name Gate Way.  Perhaps a bit heavier than Galaxies, this treads similar ground.  Spacey prog with a Pink Floyd feel married to gorgeous, soft and wispy dreamlike folk.  Ms. Thibault is a hell of a keyboardist and she displays her wares through out the album.  This deluxe reissue arrives in a mini-lp sleeve, is loaded with bonus tracks, and has a great booklet with an interview with Ms. Thibault.  She's had an interesting life.  It would seem that the time period that Evening Colours was recorded was a bit of a train wreck for her - definitely a good read.  These Laurence Vanay release are clearly two of the best reissues of 2013.  Save yourself hundreds of dollars and hours trying to find an original vinyl copy.  This was transferred from the original master tapes and sounds wonderful.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • You might recognize this album...you should.  Like the rest of the Egg catalog, Patrick Vian's sole album was heavily imported into the US by JEM Records.  Back in the day, this album was everywhere.  In fact I still run across copies in the used bins from time to time.  It even made the Nurse With Wound list.  Originally released in 1976, it finally has found an audience and has been reissued by Staubgold.  Patrick Vian is the son of French jazz musician Boris Vian.  He was also a member of the underground rock band Red Noise, who made one album that is quite well known among prog and psych collectors.  Bruits Et Temps Analogues is actually quite an interesting album that has probably been taken for granted over the years.  Vian has assembled a high caliber instrumental quartet that includes noted percussionist Mino Cinelu.  Vian plays a variety of analog synths  - Moogs and ARPs.  George Granier is the second keyboardist and Ame Son's Bernard Lavialle plays guitar.  The music is flat out prog rock.  Vian's use of synths has a bit of a spacey quality but not in a textural way - he's playing laser-like leads while the band plays in a bit of a jazz rock style.  The rockier tracks sound a bit like Egg stablemates Ose and Heldon.  So you wind up with this weird amalgam of styles that come across like a mash up of Heldon and Gong.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • "With over 150 gigs under their collective belt this is the last live performance by the Double Trio. What we hear is a band that was undoubtedly tired and feeling the strains of such an intensive and energy-consuming schedule. Bruford has remarked that his last show ever playing under the banner of King Crimson was “played out with packs of ice, and through a fog of painkillers” thanks to a wrist injury he had picked up along the tour. Being professionals they carry off a performance which probably doesn’t count as one of their best but is lifted aloft by an enthusiastic and supportive Philedelphia crowd.They hurtle through the set like a bunch of cross-country runners desperate to reach the finishing line. In what might well be the quickest version of Indiscipline, Belew delivers the words at breakneck speed, while the haste with which LTIA 2 is dispatched borders on the indecent."
    $17.00
  • The band's second album for Arista. Personally I always preferred this one ahead of their debut but that's a personal choice (no hate e-mails please). Indispensible prog.
    $14.00
  • "Coming to a new Edguy is always a good thing. Ten years ago this German melodic heavy metal band single-handedly brought me back to metal in the 21st century (helping to revive me from a decade lost to grunge in nu-metal). Age of the Joker is their ninth studio album, with the band offering both classic and new Edguy.For classic Edguy, tale-telling in epic melodic power metal form, look to Rock of Cashel, The Arcane Guild, and Behind the Gates to Midnight World as they all have that large ambitious Edguy sound. Rock of Cashel offers strong melodic metal with a smooth groove, piano segue half way, and then guitar solos with a celtic feel. The Arcane Guild finds the band echoing the VGO era with galloping power metal, but infused with some Hammond style organ. (Edguy seems to allow for more liberal and evident keyboard presence throughout this disc.) Typical Edguy, Behind the Gates to Midnight World is extravagant: epic melodic metal with varied movements of mixed tempos. The opener Robin Hood also fits this style but, of all the songs, is nearly too typical, almost caricature, of Edguy power metal. It would have been better to put it at the end or, at the very least, switched with Nobody's Feel (which would have been a better start).If bombastic power metal is characteristic of Edguy, so also is extremely catchy melodic metal. Edguy has an uncanny ability blur metal with a strong hard rock groove. Nobody's Hero, the radio friendly tunes Breathe and (vulgar) Two Out of Seven or, to a slightly lesser extent, Fire on the Downline allow the listener to tap his toe and band his head in a single romp. And what would an Edguy album be without a metal ballad? Incomplete, you answer. Every Night Without You is not quite as inspiring as Land of the Miracle, but follows the formula: passionate and soaring.However, the novelty of Age of the Joker is the unlikely and extremely enjoyable Pandora's Box. Beginning with some interesting acoustic/steel guitar work the song develops into that blur of accessible melodic hard rock and metal. Yet, the best part is the return of that steel guitar in blues fashion for the solo. Match this with the catchy melody and chorus, and the new Edguy becomes the surprising evolving Edguy. Age of the Joker is worth this song alone.With Age of the Joker, Edguy continues from strength to strength, another fine album of melodic heavy metal from a band who knows their craft, and keeps getting better at it. Strongly recommended." - Danger Dog
    $6.00
  • To commemorate their 10th anniversary, Riverside has recorded a new 3 song “mini-album”. This 33 minute work consists of three long tracks that segue into one cohesive whole. Stylistically it’s a return to the spacier melancholy sound of their debut “Out Of Myself”. Memories In My Head is a musical rollercoaster ride of deep emotional power. This new release also marks the band's return to the Laser’s Edge, the label that they began their incredible journey with. Recommended to fans of Porcupine Tree, Pink Floyd, and Anathema.
    $10.00
  • "The year 2013 has proven to be a very, very busy one for Metallica. From playing sold-out shows all across the globe to just a few nights ago rocking a packed house at the intimate and legendary Apollo Theater in New York City, the legendary metal band is showing no signs of slowing down any time soon. This is most obvious in the simple fact that within the same week, they are celebrating the release of their first ever full-length feature film and its official soundtrack. ‘Metallica Through The Never’ is a live disc fans need to add to their ‘Tallica collection as soon as possible.Recorded over the course of five nights in 2012 – two in Edmonton, Alberta and three in Vancouver, British Columbia – ‘Metallica Through The Never’ features the best of the best from those performances, while packing a few punches fans won’t be expecting. Diving into the soundtrack, it’s easy to think that you’re just listening to a standard recording of Metallica, but don’t be fooled: this is a movie soundtrack and it has several surprises scattered throughout the 16 tracks.Taking a look at the track listing, the first surprise that will jump out to hardcore fans is the fact that the band played ‘…And Justice For All.’ For the uninitiated, this is one of the most complex songs written by Metallica, and because of that they rarely play it live. In fact, it’s only been played a little more than 230 times since it first debuted on-stage in Budapest, Hungary on Sept. 11, 1988.Other surprises on the album come in the form of technical glitches. While it might sound strange, the surprises are actually very cool and add to the experience of ‘Metallica Through The Never’ being a movie soundtrack, rather than just a live album. The technical mishaps you hear on ‘Ride the Lightning’ and ‘Enter Sandman’ play significant roles in the plot of the film. During the latter song, frontman James Hetfield talks to the crowd and explains what is going on. “Two people got hurt up here but they will be OK,” he tells the crowd. “Can we get some lights up here to assess the damage, please? Should we keep playing?” And with that, the crowd goes nuts as Metallica tear into ‘Hit the Lights.’The last song on the two-disc soundtrack is the instrumental, ‘Orion.’ Played in an empty arena with no crowd cheering the band along, the song has a powerful, yet haunting feel to it. It’s the perfect performance to wrap up the soundtrack as it’s the same song that the band plays during the closing credits of the movie.Full of classic tracks like ‘Creeping Death’ and ‘Master of Puppets,’ with a few more recent tunes like ‘Fuel,’ ‘The Memory Remains’ and ‘Cyanide,’ the ‘Metallica Through The Never’ soundtrack is one of the best sounding live albums released in a long time, and might be the best ever released by Metallica. The only thing that might have taken this album to a new level is the inclusion of a new song; something to get fans ready for the next Metallica album, whenever that might be.Lars Ulrich‘s drums have never sounded better on a live recording, Kirk Hammett‘s solos pierce through your speakers and Robert Trujillo‘s thunderous bass hits you in your chest. All of that is complimented by Hetfield’s signature vocals and heavy guitar riffs. It’s mixed perfectly by Metallica soundman Greg Fidelman and is the essential companion to the movie.‘Metallica Through The Never’ is a fiery compilation that is full of heavy metal and a few surprises (don’t worry – we didn’t spoil all of them for you). Fans shouldn’t expect anything less from one of metal’s greatest bands." - Loudwire
    $7.00
  • Debut CD from this intense Norwegian band.  High Priest Of Saturn are a stoner band with strong retro overtones.  This is slow moving heaviness fusing psychedelia and doom metal.  Echoed female vocals, distorted guitar and a plodding rhythm section spread out over four loooong tracks."Stuck up on the icy western coast of Norway, Trondheim might not be the easiest way to embark on intergalactic voyages but it surely does hold an incredibly versatile metal and rock scene whose latest avatar is ready to take you on a hell of a trip.Self-described as a psychedelic doom act inspired by classic stoner bands and 60s and 70s psychedelic rock, High Priest of Saturn are a three piece that consist of guitarist Martin Sivertsen and guitarist-drummer Andreas Hagen's slow-pounding riffs and beats and Merethe Heggset's eerie vocals, which seem to resonate from another dimension. The entire opus then is drenched with swirling, menacing vintage organ sounds, played on the album by Ole Kristian Malmedal.Groovy yet epic (none of the four tracks presented here are below the nine minutes mark!), High Priest of Saturn's debut full-length is a trip. Not only does it fulfill the many promises offered by their 2011 demo (whose two songs have been re-recorded here in even heavier and more mesmerizing versions), but it also propels this trio towards the same league as Sleep and Acid King, towards the sky and beyond. " 
    $18.00
  • Hyperdrive marks a new era for Knight Area.  The long running Dutch progressive rock band had previously released four studio albums and toured Europe and USA extensively, performing at all major prog rock festivals.  1n 2012 the band welcomed guitarist Mark Bogert as well as legendary bassist Peter Vink (Q65, Finch, Ayreon) into the fold. With these newcomers onboard, Knight Area introduced a heavier element and fuller sound to their repertoire.  All the classic symphonic rock traits of their previous albums are still clearly evident but the songs on Hyperdrive are more immediate and concise.The band invited noted prog guitarist Arjen Lucassen (Ayreon, Star One) to participate as a special guest on one track.  Joost van den Broek, who is known for his production work with Epica, Mayan, and After Forever, mixed the album.   Rounding out the package is startling artwork by Gustavo Sazes.
    $14.00
  • Steven Wilson's solo career apart from Porcupine Tree, is for this listener, far more interesting.  Whereas PTree currently skirts the line between rock and metal, his solo work fits squarely in the progressive rock arena.  The Raven That Refused To Sing (and other stories) is easily his magnum opus.  The musicianship is stellar - he recorded with his touring band: Nick Beggs (Stick), Guthrie Govan (guitar), Adam Holzman (keys), Marco Minnemann (drums), and Theo Travis (flute, sax).  Mr. Wilson has also dug two things out of mothballs - King Crimson's Mellotron and Alan Parsons.  It was Steven Wilson's wish to one day work with Alan Parsons, who came on board as engineer.  I can't tell you who is responsibile for what but I can tell you that the production is impeccable.  The opening epic "Luminol" drips with the holy 'tron sounding like a cross-generation blend of King Crimson eras.  And so it goes through out the album.  Some utterly fierce playing on this album.  From beginning to end a stunning effort.  BUY OR DIE!
    $11.00
  • Remastered edition with 3 unreleased demos."Although punk rock's furious revolution threatened to overthrow rock's old guard in 1977, bands like Foreigner came along and proved that there was plenty of room in the marketplace for both the violent, upstart minimalism of punk and the airbrushed slickness of what would be called "arena rock." Along with Boston, Journey, Heart, and others, Foreigner celebrated professionalism over raw emotion. And, looking back, it's easy to see why they sold millions; not everyone in the world was pissed off, dissatisfied with the economy, or even necessarily looking for a change. In fact, for most suburban American teens, Foreigner's immaculate rock sound was the perfect soundtrack for cruising through well-manicured neighborhoods in their Chevy Novas. The album spawned some of the biggest FM hits of 1977, including the anthemic "Feels Like the First Time" and "Cold as Ice," both of which were anchored -- like most of Foreigner's songs -- by the muscular but traditional riffing of guitarist Mick Jones, the soaring vocals of Lou Gramm, and the state-of-the-art rock production values of the day, which allowed the band to sound hard but polished. As pure rock craftsmanship goes, Foreigner was as good as it got in the late '70s." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "Code of Silence is the creation of Paul Logue, founder and bass player of Eden’s Curse, and friend James Murray. These two Scotsman had the idea to create a new melodic heavy metal band composed mostly of their country men. It almost worked out for them, three out of five ain't bad.Logue wrote the music and Murray contributed the lyrical themes (based upon history and legend of the Knights Templar), but also plays bass. They got Scots John Clelland and Scott McLean to play drums and keyboards, respectively. The two also pitched in on some songwriting. Logue and Murray turned to England for guitar, recruiting young prodigy Ben Randall, and to Brazil for the experience of vocalist Gus Monsanto (Revolution Renaissance, Takara, Adagio).The result is a rather stellar Dark Skies Over Babylon, 11 songs of classic melodic heavy/power metal. If you like the sound and direction of Eden's Curse, then Code of Silence will be right in your comfort zone. In other words, there's a perfect combination of heaviness, melody, hooks, and rock groove. Along side these things is very strong song composition, artfully merging the arrangement with every instrument. You'll hear these strengths the notable songs Dark Skies Over Babylon, Black Abyss, and Here to Heaven. For the some of that aforementioned hearty hooks and groove look to Sky Is Falling Down and Witches of November. Alternatively, Tame the Tempest may also have some slight prog metal nuances and Knights of the Crimson Cross delivers straight power metal. Fundamentally then, Dark Skies Over Babylon is a well-crafted and entertaining record of traditional melodic metal. Quite recommended." - Dangerdog.com
    $15.00
  • "I’ve been waiting for the release of “Endgame” for some time now, this is honestly the first time I have been excited about a Megadeth album in years and this is due partially to the hiring of the incredible Chris Broderick, but mainly due to Dave Mustaine’s change of attitude toward the writing process with the album. Dave has been quite open during the recording process regularly updating his fans on the Megadeth forums and his latest venture TheLiveLine where he has been posting audio messages. I’m not sure if this was a conscious effort to restore some respect but it seems to have worked, there has been a lot of praise for Mustaine and the new Megadeth lineup over the last few months and has helped elevate not only Megadeth’s public profile but apparently Dave Mustaine’s songwriting abilities back to a level we haven’t experienced for some time. Before I go any further I want to point out that I have managed to avoid reading any reviews of this album as I wanted to approach Endgame without any kind of outside influence before writing about it.Dave Mustaine has always made good choices when it comes to hiring new talent and although he is probably sick of hearing it the appointment of Chris Broderick was the most exciting news since Marty Friedman joined the band. Don’t get me wrong though, Chris certainly won’t be taking all the glory, Dave’s brutal rhythm playing is as crisp and perfectly timed as ever. There is a lot of texture on this album such as the excellent “44 Minutes” with its machine gun verse riffs and layered guitar melodies over the chorus and trademark Megadeth solo trading. The outro on this track has some jaw droppingly terrifying playing from Chris Broderick.The first track on Endgame is an instrumental which I was surprised about but it is almost like Dave is saying, check out how awesome my band are! It is a great double-bass pedal thumping track with solos galore, a nice way to introduce Chris as the new Mega-Shredder™.“1,320” is another classic sounding Megadeth song, the lyrics are a bit cheesy (is it about drag racing?) but the riffs are brutal, the solos are harmonised, Dave sounds angry and the ending is double-time, always a winner!Other highlights including the chugging rhythms of “Bodies“, the fierce audio assualt that is “Head Crusher” which was released as a teaser track a while back. This was a great marketing idea to get people interested because it is probably the most “Thrash” sounding track on the album with “Holy Wars…” kind of punch you in the face riff except with much bigger and better sounding production.The production on this album is up there with United Abominations (which takes some beating) for quality. Everything has a lot more space compared to United Abominations, although I did like the in-your-face dry guitar sounds on that album, the reverb on Endgame does push the solos into the background a little more.The only part of this album that I don’t like is the ballad “The hardest part of letting go – sealed with a kiss“… ballads on a Megadeth album? Dave singing a love song really sounds wrong to me, especially the whispered “goodbye” toward the end of the track. The only thing that saves this song is that after 1:40 the acoustic love song turns into a galloping metal riff for 1 1/2 minutes where the song is much more Megadeth and less Def Leppard, then it returns back to the power ballad. A small blemish on an otherwise brilliant album.If you are an old school Megadeth fan you are going to love this album, I actually finished listening to it the first time wanting more tracks. If you are new to Megadeth you couldn’t have discovered them at a better time, Dave Mustaine has firmly taken hold of the reigns in order to re-establish Megadeth as one of the greatest Metal bands in history with an album that will be talked about for years to come." - Guitar Noize
    $10.00