Black Clouds & Silver Linings

"This album's a musical and emotional rollercoaster, but most of our albums are,' Mike Portnoy says of Black Clouds & Silver Linings, Dream Theater's tenth studio album and second Roadrunner release. Black Clouds & Silver Linings marks another milestone on Dream Theater's iconoclastic musical journey,

which began two and a half decades ago and now encompasses a hugely impressive body of music that's established the durable progressive metal outfit as a one-of-a-kind creative force with a fiercely devoted international fan base. The new album - produced by band members Mike Portnoy and John Petrucci, who also serve as the group's main lyricists - offers a vibrant manifestation of the world-class musicianship, vivid lyrical scenarios and ambitious, multi-leveled
compositions that have established Dream Theater as a uniquely compelling creative force."

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
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0
I enjoyed this cd quite alot. It's a little heavier than some of their more recent albums, which is good for me. I was a little disappointed with 'the shattered fortress", however. It would have been an amazing song, had it not been a medley of previous songs...can't figure out why they would make it 12+ minutes long, either. First and last song are the standouts.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
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0
Again D/T does it again one of their best Cds , I woul compare this to their 6 Degree album indeed, great jog, A bit better than last one ..B.Ricci
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
There are mixed reviews of this album and mostly because everyone is comparing it to their previous releases. In my humble opinion this is one of the best albums they have released in recent years. But let's compare it to present day and other prog metal bands. If this was a debut album from a new band then I think the reaction would be - WOW! So why not take into consideration that these seasoned veterans are still churning out CD's that are still as good, if not better, than most other new / younger prog metal bands and still one of the best releases of 2009. Pretty damn good achievement I would say.So in context, this is well worth your hard earned cash. S UK.
Fri, 2010-09-17 09:23
Rate: 
0
Isolate and compare the songs themselves to any commercial pop music, and you hear little improvement over the family-friendly styrofoam. Isolate the instruments, and you hear pointless, cheesy, boring noodling. At one point you even start to hear what sounds like keyboard flatulence..were they that bored? Last, the riffs are usually your typical rock/blues found in nearly every song since the dawn of R&R. The more metal-ish riffs are fine, but they degenerate fast and then the R&B/pop-rock melodies minus them out anyway. Not one thing has changed with this band since their first or second album. Who would really pay a penny to hear this?
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
I enjoyed this cd quite alot. It's a little heavier than some of their more recent albums, which is good for me. I was a little disappointed with 'the shattered fortress", however. It would have been an amazing song, had it not been a medley of previous songs...can't figure out why they would make it 12+ minutes long, either. First and last song are the standouts.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
Again D/T does it again one of their best Cds , I woul compare this to their 6 Degree album indeed, great jog, A bit better than last one ..B.Ricci
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
There are mixed reviews of this album and mostly because everyone is comparing it to their previous releases. In my humble opinion this is one of the best albums they have released in recent years. But let's compare it to present day and other prog metal bands. If this was a debut album from a new band then I think the reaction would be - WOW! So why not take into consideration that these seasoned veterans are still churning out CD's that are still as good, if not better, than most other new / younger prog metal bands and still one of the best releases of 2009. Pretty damn good achievement I would say.So in context, this is well worth your hard earned cash. S UK.
Fri, 2010-09-17 09:23
Rate: 
0
Isolate and compare the songs themselves to any commercial pop music, and you hear little improvement over the family-friendly styrofoam. Isolate the instruments, and you hear pointless, cheesy, boring noodling. At one point you even start to hear what sounds like keyboard flatulence..were they that bored? Last, the riffs are usually your typical rock/blues found in nearly every song since the dawn of R&R. The more metal-ish riffs are fine, but they degenerate fast and then the R&B/pop-rock melodies minus them out anyway. Not one thing has changed with this band since their first or second album. Who would really pay a penny to hear this?
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