Beyond The Shrouded Horizon (2CD)

New double album is a continuation of Out Of The Tunnel's Mouth (much of the material was composed during those sessions). The first album also contains a couple of tracks that indicate Steve Howe and Jonathan Mover among the co-writers so I assume this is refurbished and unreleased GTR material. Chris Squire and Simon Phillips also play on the album so its probably taken from the still to be released Squackett album. The bonus disc contains 9 tracks that were recorded at previous sessions.


So what's the story with the music? Well...it's pretty great. Mr. Hackett is still writing progressive rock. His playing is always inspired - whether acoustic or electric. Some of the tracks have a slow burn quality and others just blaze away. Whenever I hear his acoustic work I wish he would record a duet with Gordon Giltrap - that would be something to hear. I don't know if its studio wizardry or he's just gotten better but his vocals (which were previously a bit of a distraction) are totally fine. This one really hits the spot in the right way. Highly recommended.

Product Review

Mon, 2011-09-26 16:44
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Holy Shit, This is by far the best SH cd I own (and I have them all). Every cut is a Killer, I wish I could Meet Mr Hackett & thank him personnally for all the great Music he has given us over the years....Excellent cd ,No holes Barred...Amazing, & the wierd thing about it His next release will probably out do this.....Unreal... Get it BUY OR DIE.......R.Ricci
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Product Review

Mon, 2011-09-26 16:44
Rate: 
0
Holy Shit, This is by far the best SH cd I own (and I have them all). Every cut is a Killer, I wish I could Meet Mr Hackett & thank him personnally for all the great Music he has given us over the years....Excellent cd ,No holes Barred...Amazing, & the wierd thing about it His next release will probably out do this.....Unreal... Get it BUY OR DIE.......R.Ricci
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