Beyond Man And Time

SKU: GAOM 009
Label:
Gentle Art Of Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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RPWL are a popular German prog band. They began life as a Pink Floyd cover band. The vestiges of that sound are still apparent. It would probably be safer to say that the material bears some similarity to David Gilmour's recent solo work but there are other influences at play here as well - particularly Porcupine Tree's harder edge.

"12 years after the formation of one of Germany's most successful modern Prog/art rock bands, RPWL takes its first shot at a concept album. Beyond Man and Time is a musical journey through the world outside of Platon s cave. The basic idea is a so-called revaluation of value in terms of a new way of thinking. In this world beyond man and time there exists creatures of higher knowledge that the protagonist meets allegorically along his journey: the keeper of the cave, the willingly blind, the scientist, the ugliest human, the creator, the shadow, the wise man in the desert and the fisherman. These create the musical themes for the characters in Beyond Man And Time , and along with oriental percussion, expanded Moog-soli and Indian sitar, create a well placed, atmospheric and colorful adaptation of the theme. RPWL have always been about originality and experimentation and Beyond Man And Time is a vast sociological journey through the depths of man s psyche and a welcome addition to their catalogue of exceptional and creative releases."

Product Review

Sat, 2012-03-17 20:19
Rate: 
0
I had such high hopes for this release but it was mediocre from start to finish. I have been a long-time fan of RPWL, and every release in my opinion has been well crafted. Althought, the musicianship is solid on the new release as is on there previous albums,but in terms of intensity/raising the bar, "Beyond Man" was not able to pull it off for this fan. Most of the tracks were very light/low key in comparison to previous releases. The upside is, out of all of their music, if this is the only release that is "average", then I have strong belief that RPWL can easily redeem themselves on future releases.
Fri, 2012-05-18 13:09
Rate: 
0
After many listens I have to say that I really like this album. This is grower, and more I listen to it,more I like it. I cant see how this album would disappoint any RPWL fan. I would rank this relase before the previous one.
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Product Review

Sat, 2012-03-17 20:19
Rate: 
0
I had such high hopes for this release but it was mediocre from start to finish. I have been a long-time fan of RPWL, and every release in my opinion has been well crafted. Althought, the musicianship is solid on the new release as is on there previous albums,but in terms of intensity/raising the bar, "Beyond Man" was not able to pull it off for this fan. Most of the tracks were very light/low key in comparison to previous releases. The upside is, out of all of their music, if this is the only release that is "average", then I have strong belief that RPWL can easily redeem themselves on future releases.
Fri, 2012-05-18 13:09
Rate: 
0
After many listens I have to say that I really like this album. This is grower, and more I listen to it,more I like it. I cant see how this album would disappoint any RPWL fan. I would rank this relase before the previous one.
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