Bask

Bask

BY Bask

(Customer Reviews)
$8.00
SKU: NSD6036
Label:
NorthSide
Category:
World Music
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ONE OF A KIND TITLE FROM THE LASER'S EDGE ARCHIVE

"Bask consists of flautist Jonas Simonson, saxophonist/percussionist Sten Kallman and fiddler Hans Kennemark. This unique instrumentation brings a freshness to their self-titled debut album, which arranges original and traditional melodies originally intended for solo fiddle into acoustic trio pieces. Bask's deceptively simple counterpoints and harmonies make for enjoyable listening, as background music or with closer scrutiny." - ALLMUSIC

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  • "Drummer Ian Wallace (King Crimson, Jackson Brown, Don Henley, Bonnie Raitt) is joined by Jody Nardone and Tim Landers, and special guest Mel Collins, on this masterful interpretation of Crimson classics which is sure to please King Crimson fans and jazz aficionados alike. Volume Two takes the CJ3 a step further in its interpretations of the King Crimson catalog.These songs represent the final recordings in this life by the extraordinary drummer Ian Wallace. They represent the culmination of a lifelong dream and years of study, devotion, hard work and passion for the drums. They honor his past and his love of the music made with, and made by, his brothers in King Crimson. They celebrate his love of jazz. They are a beautiful swan song from an incredible musician.Volume Two is a slight departure from CJ3's first release, finding the trio taking more liberties with the material. The listener will hear more experimentation in the playing as well as the arrangements. The recording features ex-Crimson saxophonist Mel Collins on two pieces and finds Jody Nardone lending his vocals to a track. Like Volume One, Volume Two is, as it was intended, more experiment than a tribute album. It stands alone as a beautiful, and perfectly performed jazz album, as well as a medium to experience Crimson in music's most improvisational art form."
    $15.00
  • One night of the band's two-week "Controlled By Radar" tour found Scott McGill, Michael Manring, and Vic Stevens booked into a jazz club in Boston. The fusion trio quickly adapted, adding some choice jazz standards to their set list…but with a twist. They performed these classsics their way – a mixture of straight up jazz, fusion and skronk. The crowd was blown away by the originality and the band's audacity. As the band continued their tour the list of standards in their set grew and the response was always overwhelming. It was decided that the band's third album would be a collection of contemporary jazz standards done the MMS way. These are three virtuoso musicians that had individually and collectively already made their mark in the world of fusion. Why not go back to their roots? If the band was going to cause a fissure in the fabric of the jazz community why not go all the way? Noted guitarist and texturalist producer David Torn (Jeff Beck, Kaki King) was asked to mix the album. The man behind the Splattercell project was given free reign to take the unmixed session tapes and "do his thing" and that is exactly what he did. The results defy all the standards of what a jazz album should sound like. It's a mutated soundscape that will make the trio villains to some and hopefully heroes to many. John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, and Sonny Rollins, among others, composed timeless classics that have been ingrained into the souls of jazz listeners for a generation. "What We Do" takes these compositions, breaks them down and reconstructs them both musically and sonically. It offers a unique and controversial interpretation of these tunes that is pure MMS. What We Do is a punk jazz manifesto for a new generation of jazz fans around the world.
    $7.00
  • Complete 2 hour performance from the band's show at The Catalyst in Santa Cruz, California. As you know Andy Latimer has been battling cancer for some years (he seems to be fighting his way back to good health) so this is billed as a farewell performance of sorts.
    $22.00
  • New edition of the excellent debut CD from this Italian "band" who's musical stylings are heavily influenced by Steven Wilson's various projects - the most obvious one being Blackfield. Another band that comes to mind would be Blow Up Hollywood. Nosound is essentially the work of Giancarlo Erra, a multi-instrumentalist. The music has a lush, dreamy feel with underpinnings of synth and Mellotron. You can feel yourself drifiting away, lost in an obscure movie sountrack. A beautiful and intelligent work."The audio CD will feature completely new digitally restored and analogue mastered audio from the original 2005 album, plus three extra re-mastered tracks (clocking in at 78 minutes of music!).

 The DVD features a brand new 10 minute video for Sol29, plus the original three ambient/experimental audio video tracks included on The World Is Outside DVD-R. As an extra for fans who missed the first release, the Kscope edition will also include all the original mixes of Sol29 as they were released on 2005 album version. This will be the final and official Sol29 release, collecting all the Nosound early studio material in one single release."
    $14.00
  • Private vinyl edition released by the band.Second album from this great French ensemble. Curiously their first album was released by Tzadik and had to be the most overtly "prog" album ever on that label. This new album is out on Altrock and is probably my favorite release on the label. The band creates a mesmerizing whirlwind of sax, keys, vibes, bass, flue, bass, and drums. There is a touch of Zappa in the compositions probably due to the vibes/marimbas that remind of Ruth Underwood. Some sexy Mini-Moog leads squiggle around the dual sax leads. All in all one killer release. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • One of the great prog albums of the 70s finally given an official reissue although for the time being it appears that its vinyl only.Kvartetten Som Sprängde recorded one album for the short lived Gump label (only 4 releases on the label I believe).  What a killer.  The band was an instrumental trio consisting of Rune Carlsson on drums and percussion, Fred Hellman on C-3 organ and piano, and Finn Sjöberg on guitar and flute.Kattvals features massive phat swirling organ sounds, lethal guitar leads, and a killer groove.  Musically the band is equally rooted in prog, jazz rock, hard rock, and even latin rock.  The band is often comparted to Santana and to some degree that is true.  Hellman's organ work brings to mind Greg Rolie.  He is the perfect foil for Sjöberg's fluid soloing.  The music has a bit of a loose jamming feel to it without flying off the handle.Quite simply one of the best.  BUY OR DIE!
    $32.00
  • "Formed in 1979, Sky brought together the worlds of rock and classical music in a highly successful and inspiring way. Featuring the gifted talents of guitarist JOHN WILLIAMS, percussionist TRISTAN FRY, legendary bass player HERBIE FLOWERS, former Curved Air keyboard player FRANCIS MONKMAN and guitarist KEVIN PEEK, Sky recorded their debut album at Abbey Road studios in the early months of 1979. Featuring the lengthy suite "Where Opposite’s Meet”, "Westway” and "Cannonball” (also released as a single), the band’s self-titled debut reached the UK top ten in May 1979 and went on to achieve Platinum status in the UK and was also a major hit in Europe and Australia.This Esoteric Recordings edition has been newly re-mastered and includes the bonus tracks ‘Dies Irae’, the single version of ‘March to the Scaffold’ (Previously unreleased on CD), and a live version of ‘Where Opposites Meet’ recorded by BBC Radio One at a charity concert at Wembley Arena in November 1979. This deluxe edition also includes a DVD (NTSC / Region Free) featuring all of Sky’s surviving BBC TV appearances in 1979, all previously unreleased on video or DVD.  The original album artwork is fully restored and the booklet features a new essay."
    $19.00
  • Domestic pressing of the second album from this superb Polish prog band. While their first album tended to veer more towards the metal side, Metafiction is a bit lighter - but only in overall sound, not thematically. There are plenty of heavy moments but lets call it heavy progressive rock as opposed to metal. Whereas Riverside initially drew heavily from bands like Porcupine Tree, Opeth, and Anathema they ultimately found their own voice. Votum find themselves at the same crossroads. These bands are all similar influences emphasizing atmosphere and mood. Melancholy prevails - this is not an upbeat sounding album. The heavy parts may seem heavier because the quiet parts...are well...they are quieter! This adds to the dynamics of the album and overall it draws you right in to an inxoticating dreamscape. Easily one of 2009's best albums. Lets hope with a US release they are able to find an audience here. Highest recommendation.
    $13.00
  • "David Sylvian's solo output since 1984 bears some similarity to the likes of Brian Eno and John Foxx in that their solo albums of more conventional songs appear inbetween more ambitious, collaborative pieces of ambient soundscapes and soundtracks to multiple-media projects.His 1999 album Dead Bees on a Cake was his first solo album since 1987's Secrets of the Beehive, and features an impressive array of guest musicians. Musically, this album is very much in keeping with his previous work such as ... Beehive, Brilliant Trees, and the Rain Tree Crow project which saw him reunited with ex-Japan bandmates. Songs are consistently mid-tempo, the performances are meticulous, restrained, and evocative of Eastern modes. The production and mixing gives a 'spacious' feel to the sound, allowing each musical part, both the sequenced and the performed, a massive amount of space to breathe.The opening number, "I Surrender," clocks in at a over nine minutes long. It's warm, jazzy tones are at times angular and tense, but the underlying melodies are as strong as anything in Sylvian's canon. There's also a gorgeous flugelhorn solo from avant-garde jazzman Kenny Wheeler. Another of the guest illuminati, Ryiuichi Sakamoto provides one the albums highlights on "Alphabet Angel" with a luscious, soft Rhodes piano solo.Throughout the album, Sylvian's voice - a solitary, detached baritone is in excellent form, and whilst his solo albums typically don't have a huge range of quiet-loud dynamics, there is enough diversity in the tones and influence of these songs to engage the listener. "God Man" almost sounds like an unplugged Alice in Chains experimenting with jazz, and the beautiful "Cafe Europa" provides moments which are as close to Radio 2-friendly as this album gets, and that's attributable in no small part to the guest appearances of Ingrid Chavez and Talvin Singh.I can't rank Brilliant Trees, Secrets and Dead Bees... in order of quality. They all exist in their own space, yet also seem to be constituent parts of the same thing. They're complex enough to warrant repeated listening (especially late in the evening with a glass of something strong), yet at the same time, penetrable enough for newcomers. It is perhaps, a blessing that David Sylvian doesn't produce albums of this nature more prolifically - the perfection and subtlety in the performances would be lost if these pieces were composed too often, or with too little of the attention to detail that is their hallmark." - Blog Critics
    $10.00
  • Quite simply one of the greatest progressive rock albums of all time. This album is very dear to me and many of you will remember that some years ago we released the 3 SFF albums on a 2CD set. Its been out of print for many years and through the efforts of Esoteric Recordings they are back in print, as individual releases.Symphonic Pictures was recorded in 1975. The trio of Eduard Schicke (drums), Gerd Fuhrs (keyboards), and Heinz Frohling (bass/guitar) was formed from the remnants of Spektakel (another one of our out of print releases). The band was signed to Brain Records. Originally Frank Zappa was going to produce their debut but because of scheduling commitments he had to back out. Instead the band worked with Dieter Dierks who was the rising star producer at the time. The album is all instrumental. It consists of the four shorter tracks and then culminates in the side long epic "Pictures". This is one of the great Mellotron albums...ever. One can easily hear how deeply Anglagard was influenced by this album. Three virtuoso musicians creating amazing symphonic rock. It just doesn't get better than this one...or does it? Esoteric has included a bonus disc containing parts of an archival live recording from Papenburg, Germany in 1975. This features two tracks that are not on the album and clearly demonstrates that SFF could pull it off live as well. Perhaps I'm too close to this album but from my perspective its BUY OR DIE! Highest recommendation possible.
    $15.00
  • "Poverty, disease, environmental destruction, deep-rooted corruption – there’s a lot going on in the world to freak out about. 65daysofstatic are out to prove that that even what seems hopeless can be uplifting it catches the light the right way. Paul Wolinski, Joe Shrewsbury, Rob Jones and Simon Wright have been a band just long enough to see the tragic complexity of the new millennium unfold in real time. And what better way to keep tabs on the misfortunes and malaises of our world than to provide soundtracks for them?As you might have surmised without listening, 65daysofstatic’s debut, The Fall of Math, was an album of guitar-driven post-rock. Each successive release has gradually nudged the Sheffield quartet closer to electronica, up to and including 2010’s We Were Exploding Anyway and 2011’s alternate soundtrack to the 1972 sci-fi film, Silent Running. Wild Light is their sixth studio release, and it’s most certainly their most computerized. Taking their body of work as one extensive artistic statement, it is also quite inarguably the zenith of their career.Released in mid-September in the UK and due stateside at the end of the month, Wild Light a towering achievement of vision, ambition and imagination. These lumbering sonic skyscrapers readily substitute the ethereal for the palpable, the fear-inducing for the exalting, seamlessly collating the drivers behind 65daysofstatic’s development as a band. It has a tendency to remind you of other post-rock acts without actually sounding all that much like them. There’s the Promethean grandeur of Godspeed You! Black Emperor, the physicality of Battles, and the earthbound patience of Explosions in the Sky or Lanterna.The imagery of Wild Light is nightmarish and audacious, but the thickly mantled compositions are often beautiful, surging towards some unobtainably lofty plane. Only a handful of tracks start out on modest terms. Listening to “Taipei” is like rewinding the tape on glowing embers and watching as they renew themselves into a massive bonfire; piano-focused “The Undertow” unfolds as an interlude, sequenced between two of Wild Light’s more intense offerings, “Prisms” and “Black Spots”.The particulars of what 65daysofstatic try to achieve with their sound are so abundantly realized as to be self-evident. They address their hefty subject matter without uttering a single word, electing instead to express themselves through physical movement. Wild Light is a fully intact listening experience, peppered with sonic leitmotifs that fold back onto themselves once the final chords are drowned out by silence.Along with cyclicality and recursion, 65daysofstatic seem fascinated with the (rather complimentary) concept of time. One of the more plausible theories for how our universe will die is that all of the energy that can be expended will be expended; we will reach maximum entropy and simply fade, which is a bit of a bummer. With its title in mind, the tireless grind of intro “Heat Death Infinity Splitter” illuminates the inevitability of our collective fate. The mechanistic synth lurches and doomed guitar bends that recall Swans track “Lunacy”, and it’s equally as dread-inducing.But if this all sounds a little too morbid, its tempered by the obvious joy and care with which 65daysofstatic approach their art. There are nods to the their past, with tracks like “Blackspots” recalling some of the aggression of their earliest releases. Elsewhere, they’re as mild as they’ve ever been. Sendoff “Safe Passage” features nearly no percussion, instead opting for iridescent washes of noise. “Prisms” begins as an experiment in atonality, smash cutting from black hole drone to ecstatic synth bombast before a pair of plush tremolo guitars take control; one last rave tune before end times.Everything reaches a breathless climax on “Unmake the Wild Light”. Its somber segments topple into one another, each a fluent extension of what came before it to create a magnificent collage of roving bass lines, Rorschach drum patterns and blurry power chords. Although to call it a climax is to downplay the impact found elsewhere. Every moment here is inspired. For anyone who can appreciate emotional breadth that music is capable of conveying, make Wild Light a part of your life. It may be the best instrumental album you hear this year." - Pretty Much Amazing
    $15.00
  • "One of the most elegantly complex and fully realized of the "difficult" Italian classics, Melos is for fans of the Osanna, Balletto di Bronzi, RRR, and Semiramis styles. I have a hunch that fans of Crimson, VDGG, and Gentle Giant will also approve. It will probably be less appreciated by fans of the gentler and more accessible bands like Celeste and Locanda delle Fate. The musical approach and the sound are very sophisticated and unique. A combination of primarily guitars, flutes and saxes are tightly woven into a very dense, often dark, unsettling, and just plain eerie feel. Some sources say there are no (or very little) keyboards used to create this sound palette which is certainly unusual. Sometimes I think I hear some but I can't be sure the way the other instruments are employed. It took me many plays to really get past the rather exhausting outer shell and discover the melodies hiding inside and now I just cannot get enough of this excellent material. This band from Naples was related to the Osanna band via the Rustici brothers, the younger one in Cervello was another example of how the very young were leaders in the Italian scene back then. Corrado Rustici was but a teenager when the band recorded Melos in Milan back in 1973. While Osanna's big album "Palepoli" generally gets the most attention my personal view is that "Melos" is a better album. While not as trippy as the wildly freaky "Palepoli" I feel that Melos is more overtly musical and more genuinely satisfying in the long run.Juan at ItalianProg describes the Cervello sound like this: "There is great deal of excellent acoustic guitar work and mellotron-like sounds created by the saxophones. The vocals coupled with the acoustic guitar and flutes hypnotize the listener into a technical yet fluid atmosphere so the music then breaks into a frenzy full of sax and adventurous guitar playing. The tempo and mood change from calm and melodic to violent and bizarre (interweaving between scales). No keyboards present, but they are not needed due to the "cerebral" arrangements these musicians have created for us on this album."[Juan Carlos Lopez] In another great review Warren Nelson sums up the sound perfectly: ".with soaring and complex melodies, compelling and angular instrumental passages culminating in some aggressive individual performances, all weaved together in a tapestry of beautiful and emotional musical syncopation. One of the few Italian prog releases without a prominent keyboard arsenal, the rich sound of this band is achieved with powerful drumming, multiple woodwinds, and intelligent scaler runs on guitar. But not least of all are the typically emotionally powerful vocals. Dynamic change-ups and exquisite group interaction complete another example of one of the finest Italian progressive albums you will ever hear."[Warren Nelson]My own take on the specific tracks: "Canto Del Capro" begins with layers of flutes over what sounds like a foghorn and cymbal splashes moving left to right in the stereo spectrum. Soon an acoustic guitar precedes delightfully freaky operatic style vocals like only the Italians can do. A thrilling opening. Suddenly the drums kick in and you think it might be "normal" for a bit but soon these ungodly compressed vocals rattle your eardrums. Strange acoustic and electric guitar flares round out the rest of this unsettling start. "Trittico" is an enchanting initially with sentimental flute melody, acoustic and vocal. Eventually a crazy sax and percussion crash the party for a bit before the soft opening style returns with additional guitar noodlings. After a brief fade the end section is a bizarre cacophony of choral voices. My one complaint is wishing the bass were a bit more clear and upfront, sometimes it is distant and muddy but it's a minor nitpick. "Euterpe" begins with acoustic and flutes again in a warm and inviting mood. This eventually leads into the full band jamming with a real e-guitar and saxophone workout. "Scinsicne" begins with guitar that sounds like it came from an outtake of "Astronomy Domine!" In comes great flute and bass interplay and then vocals which are another strong point on this album. As the band comes on full the saxes jump into the fray and the sound gets brutal. At 3:48 is one of my favorite parts of the album, these mutant bizarre sounds and drums that mimic some sinister funeral dirge. This is followed by a maniacal e-guitar solo. "Melos" features great flute and sax workouts again with another Rustici axe thrashing at the end. "Galassia" is a feast of inventive vocal interludes over beautifully played acoustic guitars. Dabbles of flute precede a full blown e-guitar freakout challenged by pursuing sax and percussion attacks. You'll need a shower after this track. "Affresco" is a rather traditional sounding closer piece, very short and there just to bring you gently back to Earth after your cerebral pummeling.I guess the reason I light up the magic star 5 would be this: Even when listening to most good albums it is evident that I am doing just that. I'm listening to a collection of songs that are just too structured and I know what is coming. They might light up my pleasure center and my brain says "oh that's a good song, let me listen to more of the same!" Melos does not allow me to stagnate. It's more like eavesdropping on someone's thoughts (presented musically) than listening to the next "killer song, dude." Their thoughts or perhaps their nightmares in this case with everything being so strange, the album starts and it's like this bizarre trip occurs. Even some of my favorite albums are relatively predictable but not Melos. With each play I still wonder what the hell is going on. It still pushes my buttons and challenges me, my definition of a genuinely progressive album. That's not the only way an album can get 5 stars from me but it is one way.This is one of the Italian albums you hear people describe as "harsh" and you might hate it the first several times you listen. Don't get discouraged. Put it away and spin it every other month..like many of the best prog albums you may end up loving it a year from now. That's how it was for me-a real grower. But while many of us are thrilled by this album it is not universally loved in the way that PFM is. It's rather confrontational sonic style does have its detractors so read plenty of reviews before you take the plunge. In my book this is essential for Italian fans and recommended for fans of stuff like "Red" era Crimson. Try to find the Japanese mini-lp sleeve edition which features decent sound and a high quality reproduction of the cool artwork. I love the cover of this album..fantastic stuff!" - ProgArchives
    $11.00
  • "Drop was the first fruit of Porcupine Tree drummer Gavin Harrison's collaboration with singer and extended range bass player 05Ric, and featured contributions from Robert Fripp, Dave Stewart and Gary Sanctuary.Nine carefully crafted songs combined with ground-breaking multi-layered guitars, vocal harmonies and rhythms.This is the 2013 Kscope edition of the duo's astonishing debut."
    $15.00
  • "The first album by Flying Colors got mixed reviews. Some people loved it (I was one of those) whilst others were disappointed that a band that included Mike Portnoy and Neal Morse had made an album that wasn't very "prog." Well, the second album from this band can't be criticised in that way because this is most definitely a prog album. Opening with a 12 minute song, and ending with a 12 minute, three part suite, these are the obvious progressive songs, but most of the shorter songs also mix pop/rock with progressive elements.So, starting at the beginning, Open Up Your Eyes is like a mini-Transatlantic epic, with the first four minutes consisting of an instrumental overture before the vocal come in. There are plenty of swirling keyboards and lead guitar, and Portnoy's characteristic drumming is there too (something that was largely absent from the first album.) The next two tracks are more in a heavy metal style, something not usually to my taste, but certainly Mask Machine has a catchy hook and is an obvious choice for a single. After Bombs Away comes a more straightforward ballad, then the rocker A Place In Your World with some nice guitar riffs and keyboard lines, plus a singalong chorus. Lost Without You is another Power Ballad and the shortest song on the album at under 5 minutes. Then we get to the point at which the album really hits the heights. I defy anyone to listen to the last 3 tracks, one after the other, and not be amazed at the genius of this band. Kicking off with One Love Forever, which has an infectious acoustic guitar riff and a celtic feel, we then move on to what is probably my favourite song on the album. Peaceful Harbour has a beautiful spiritual feel to it, and the beginning and end put me in mind of Mostly Autumn. Finally we have a real gem. Cosmic Symphony is a three part suite with sections approximately three, three and six minutes long. It starts with thunder and rain effects and a simple repeated piano line before vocals, drums and guitar come in. Finally these are joined by a melodic bass line. The second section is more jazz keyboard based and then we move on to the final part which reminded me of REM. The song ends with the same piano line and thunder effects which began it.A superb album, even better than their first and certainly proggier." - ProgArchives
    $6.00