Bask

Bask

BY Bask

(Customer Reviews)
$8.00
SKU: NSD6036
Label:
NorthSide
Category:
World Music
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ONE OF A KIND TITLE FROM THE LASER'S EDGE ARCHIVE

"Bask consists of flautist Jonas Simonson, saxophonist/percussionist Sten Kallman and fiddler Hans Kennemark. This unique instrumentation brings a freshness to their self-titled debut album, which arranges original and traditional melodies originally intended for solo fiddle into acoustic trio pieces. Bask's deceptively simple counterpoints and harmonies make for enjoyable listening, as background music or with closer scrutiny." - ALLMUSIC

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  • "Poverty, disease, environmental destruction, deep-rooted corruption – there’s a lot going on in the world to freak out about. 65daysofstatic are out to prove that that even what seems hopeless can be uplifting it catches the light the right way. Paul Wolinski, Joe Shrewsbury, Rob Jones and Simon Wright have been a band just long enough to see the tragic complexity of the new millennium unfold in real time. And what better way to keep tabs on the misfortunes and malaises of our world than to provide soundtracks for them?As you might have surmised without listening, 65daysofstatic’s debut, The Fall of Math, was an album of guitar-driven post-rock. Each successive release has gradually nudged the Sheffield quartet closer to electronica, up to and including 2010’s We Were Exploding Anyway and 2011’s alternate soundtrack to the 1972 sci-fi film, Silent Running. Wild Light is their sixth studio release, and it’s most certainly their most computerized. Taking their body of work as one extensive artistic statement, it is also quite inarguably the zenith of their career.Released in mid-September in the UK and due stateside at the end of the month, Wild Light a towering achievement of vision, ambition and imagination. These lumbering sonic skyscrapers readily substitute the ethereal for the palpable, the fear-inducing for the exalting, seamlessly collating the drivers behind 65daysofstatic’s development as a band. It has a tendency to remind you of other post-rock acts without actually sounding all that much like them. There’s the Promethean grandeur of Godspeed You! Black Emperor, the physicality of Battles, and the earthbound patience of Explosions in the Sky or Lanterna.The imagery of Wild Light is nightmarish and audacious, but the thickly mantled compositions are often beautiful, surging towards some unobtainably lofty plane. Only a handful of tracks start out on modest terms. Listening to “Taipei” is like rewinding the tape on glowing embers and watching as they renew themselves into a massive bonfire; piano-focused “The Undertow” unfolds as an interlude, sequenced between two of Wild Light’s more intense offerings, “Prisms” and “Black Spots”.The particulars of what 65daysofstatic try to achieve with their sound are so abundantly realized as to be self-evident. They address their hefty subject matter without uttering a single word, electing instead to express themselves through physical movement. Wild Light is a fully intact listening experience, peppered with sonic leitmotifs that fold back onto themselves once the final chords are drowned out by silence.Along with cyclicality and recursion, 65daysofstatic seem fascinated with the (rather complimentary) concept of time. One of the more plausible theories for how our universe will die is that all of the energy that can be expended will be expended; we will reach maximum entropy and simply fade, which is a bit of a bummer. With its title in mind, the tireless grind of intro “Heat Death Infinity Splitter” illuminates the inevitability of our collective fate. The mechanistic synth lurches and doomed guitar bends that recall Swans track “Lunacy”, and it’s equally as dread-inducing.But if this all sounds a little too morbid, its tempered by the obvious joy and care with which 65daysofstatic approach their art. There are nods to the their past, with tracks like “Blackspots” recalling some of the aggression of their earliest releases. Elsewhere, they’re as mild as they’ve ever been. Sendoff “Safe Passage” features nearly no percussion, instead opting for iridescent washes of noise. “Prisms” begins as an experiment in atonality, smash cutting from black hole drone to ecstatic synth bombast before a pair of plush tremolo guitars take control; one last rave tune before end times.Everything reaches a breathless climax on “Unmake the Wild Light”. Its somber segments topple into one another, each a fluent extension of what came before it to create a magnificent collage of roving bass lines, Rorschach drum patterns and blurry power chords. Although to call it a climax is to downplay the impact found elsewhere. Every moment here is inspired. For anyone who can appreciate emotional breadth that music is capable of conveying, make Wild Light a part of your life. It may be the best instrumental album you hear this year." - Pretty Much Amazing
    $15.00
  • Beautiful second release from this instrumental quartet from Italy. The lineup consists of two guitarists, keyboards and drums with guests on bass and flugelhorn. The music is a mix of acoustic folk and electric fusion. There is a strong Mediterranean feel reminding a bit of the work of Al DiMeola and Paco DeLucia. The acoustic pieces have a lot of technicality and intricacies that will keep your brain racing. When the electric parts kick in it will take you completely off kilter. Mature and intelligent progressive music with a great flow and feel. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • "After having made one studio-album, and two Live-DVDs and albums with Lisa Gerrard, Klaus Schulze thought it was time to give the world back the “pure” Klaus Schulze again. Having been invited by his big Japanese Fan, Mr. Gen Fujita, he and his crew flew to Tokyo to play his very first solo concerts since November 2003. The concerts in Tokyo in March 2010 were remarkable for many reasons. First of all, the Japanese crew rebuilt Klaus‘ legendary and extraordinary equipment exactly the same way as you can see it at his European concerts. Considering the fact that this equipment includes a lot of rare instruments and devices, the Japanese crew did a great job. Secondly, the concert itself contained some surprises: It was the first time that Klaus Schulze rebuilt and remodeled his classic “ Crystal Lake ” (original released 1977 on the album “Mirage”), renamed here as: “The Crystal Returns”. Also astonishing was the fact that Klaus played electric guitar on the track, “Sequencers Are Beautiful” - of course in his own, totally unconventional way. In all, these were breathtaking concerts that combined Klaus tradition and vision: You will love the sequencer-sounds as well as the new components. And of course, the DVD gives you the perfect vision of these intense and atmospheric performances. “Big In Japan” had already been released in as a box-set, limited to 500 copies and as an European Version. This American version is different to all previous editions::. The tracklisting of the two CD’s is the same as on the European Edition, but you will get a totally new DVD with different tracks – this time edited and produced by the famous French film director James Frachon, who already filmed Klaus Schulze on the DVD’s “Rheingold” and “Dziekuje Bardzo” The Artwork of this edition is blue on silver. Along with this stylish package, these historic moments are now available for every Klaus Schulze fan in America!"
    $20.00
  • Quite simply one of the greatest progressive rock albums of all time. This album is very dear to me and many of you will remember that some years ago we released the 3 SFF albums on a 2CD set. Its been out of print for many years and through the efforts of Esoteric Recordings they are back in print, as individual releases.Symphonic Pictures was recorded in 1975. The trio of Eduard Schicke (drums), Gerd Fuhrs (keyboards), and Heinz Frohling (bass/guitar) was formed from the remnants of Spektakel (another one of our out of print releases). The band was signed to Brain Records. Originally Frank Zappa was going to produce their debut but because of scheduling commitments he had to back out. Instead the band worked with Dieter Dierks who was the rising star producer at the time. The album is all instrumental. It consists of the four shorter tracks and then culminates in the side long epic "Pictures". This is one of the great Mellotron albums...ever. One can easily hear how deeply Anglagard was influenced by this album. Three virtuoso musicians creating amazing symphonic rock. It just doesn't get better than this one...or does it? Esoteric has included a bonus disc containing parts of an archival live recording from Papenburg, Germany in 1975. This features two tracks that are not on the album and clearly demonstrates that SFF could pull it off live as well. Perhaps I'm too close to this album but from my perspective its BUY OR DIE! Highest recommendation possible.
    $15.00
  • "One of the most elegantly complex and fully realized of the "difficult" Italian classics, Melos is for fans of the Osanna, Balletto di Bronzi, RRR, and Semiramis styles. I have a hunch that fans of Crimson, VDGG, and Gentle Giant will also approve. It will probably be less appreciated by fans of the gentler and more accessible bands like Celeste and Locanda delle Fate. The musical approach and the sound are very sophisticated and unique. A combination of primarily guitars, flutes and saxes are tightly woven into a very dense, often dark, unsettling, and just plain eerie feel. Some sources say there are no (or very little) keyboards used to create this sound palette which is certainly unusual. Sometimes I think I hear some but I can't be sure the way the other instruments are employed. It took me many plays to really get past the rather exhausting outer shell and discover the melodies hiding inside and now I just cannot get enough of this excellent material. This band from Naples was related to the Osanna band via the Rustici brothers, the younger one in Cervello was another example of how the very young were leaders in the Italian scene back then. Corrado Rustici was but a teenager when the band recorded Melos in Milan back in 1973. While Osanna's big album "Palepoli" generally gets the most attention my personal view is that "Melos" is a better album. While not as trippy as the wildly freaky "Palepoli" I feel that Melos is more overtly musical and more genuinely satisfying in the long run.Juan at ItalianProg describes the Cervello sound like this: "There is great deal of excellent acoustic guitar work and mellotron-like sounds created by the saxophones. The vocals coupled with the acoustic guitar and flutes hypnotize the listener into a technical yet fluid atmosphere so the music then breaks into a frenzy full of sax and adventurous guitar playing. The tempo and mood change from calm and melodic to violent and bizarre (interweaving between scales). No keyboards present, but they are not needed due to the "cerebral" arrangements these musicians have created for us on this album."[Juan Carlos Lopez] In another great review Warren Nelson sums up the sound perfectly: ".with soaring and complex melodies, compelling and angular instrumental passages culminating in some aggressive individual performances, all weaved together in a tapestry of beautiful and emotional musical syncopation. One of the few Italian prog releases without a prominent keyboard arsenal, the rich sound of this band is achieved with powerful drumming, multiple woodwinds, and intelligent scaler runs on guitar. But not least of all are the typically emotionally powerful vocals. Dynamic change-ups and exquisite group interaction complete another example of one of the finest Italian progressive albums you will ever hear."[Warren Nelson]My own take on the specific tracks: "Canto Del Capro" begins with layers of flutes over what sounds like a foghorn and cymbal splashes moving left to right in the stereo spectrum. Soon an acoustic guitar precedes delightfully freaky operatic style vocals like only the Italians can do. A thrilling opening. Suddenly the drums kick in and you think it might be "normal" for a bit but soon these ungodly compressed vocals rattle your eardrums. Strange acoustic and electric guitar flares round out the rest of this unsettling start. "Trittico" is an enchanting initially with sentimental flute melody, acoustic and vocal. Eventually a crazy sax and percussion crash the party for a bit before the soft opening style returns with additional guitar noodlings. After a brief fade the end section is a bizarre cacophony of choral voices. My one complaint is wishing the bass were a bit more clear and upfront, sometimes it is distant and muddy but it's a minor nitpick. "Euterpe" begins with acoustic and flutes again in a warm and inviting mood. This eventually leads into the full band jamming with a real e-guitar and saxophone workout. "Scinsicne" begins with guitar that sounds like it came from an outtake of "Astronomy Domine!" In comes great flute and bass interplay and then vocals which are another strong point on this album. As the band comes on full the saxes jump into the fray and the sound gets brutal. At 3:48 is one of my favorite parts of the album, these mutant bizarre sounds and drums that mimic some sinister funeral dirge. This is followed by a maniacal e-guitar solo. "Melos" features great flute and sax workouts again with another Rustici axe thrashing at the end. "Galassia" is a feast of inventive vocal interludes over beautifully played acoustic guitars. Dabbles of flute precede a full blown e-guitar freakout challenged by pursuing sax and percussion attacks. You'll need a shower after this track. "Affresco" is a rather traditional sounding closer piece, very short and there just to bring you gently back to Earth after your cerebral pummeling.I guess the reason I light up the magic star 5 would be this: Even when listening to most good albums it is evident that I am doing just that. I'm listening to a collection of songs that are just too structured and I know what is coming. They might light up my pleasure center and my brain says "oh that's a good song, let me listen to more of the same!" Melos does not allow me to stagnate. It's more like eavesdropping on someone's thoughts (presented musically) than listening to the next "killer song, dude." Their thoughts or perhaps their nightmares in this case with everything being so strange, the album starts and it's like this bizarre trip occurs. Even some of my favorite albums are relatively predictable but not Melos. With each play I still wonder what the hell is going on. It still pushes my buttons and challenges me, my definition of a genuinely progressive album. That's not the only way an album can get 5 stars from me but it is one way.This is one of the Italian albums you hear people describe as "harsh" and you might hate it the first several times you listen. Don't get discouraged. Put it away and spin it every other month..like many of the best prog albums you may end up loving it a year from now. That's how it was for me-a real grower. But while many of us are thrilled by this album it is not universally loved in the way that PFM is. It's rather confrontational sonic style does have its detractors so read plenty of reviews before you take the plunge. In my book this is essential for Italian fans and recommended for fans of stuff like "Red" era Crimson. Try to find the Japanese mini-lp sleeve edition which features decent sound and a high quality reproduction of the cool artwork. I love the cover of this album..fantastic stuff!" - ProgArchives
    $11.00
  • Simply one of the greatest Italian progressive rock albums of all time. Brilliant keyboard work in the grand tradition.  Really one of THE defining albums.  If you don't own this one you should feel embarassed and do something about it.  Seriously.
    $15.00
  • Trio of Alex Skolnick (Testament) on guitar, Tim Alexander (Primus) on drums, and Michael Mannring on bass. Although there is some structure to the songs they have a loose improvisational feel. Pretty uncommercial and not at all what you would have expected from a Magna Carta release.
    $9.00
  • "NoSound is an Italian band headed by Giancarlo Erra on vocals, guitars, and keyboards; including: Marco Berni, on keyboards and vocals; Alessandro Luci, on bass, upright bass, and keyboards; Paolo Vigliarolo, on acoustic and electric guitars; and joining them for their fourth album is accomplished drummer and former Porcupine Tree member, Chris Maitland.As a fan of the band it was great to receive this promo copy of the album.Here are my thoughts on 'Afterthoughts'.'In My Fears', opens with the solo electric guitar strumming familiar on many a NoSound album. Only this time it sounds like something far away…approaching through the mist, like a boat on the still ocean, or someone walking on the beach and slowly coming into sight,. The screeching guitar/keyboard effect that whirls around the original lead guitar only adds a soft breeze to the mystery. Giancarlo's first vocals enter the realm of consciousness, "I still feel the glow of this morning light". "I wish I could stay". "Days are so bright". Perfect. Soft, intricate piano, surrounded by waves of guitars and bass, with drums rising like wave crests. Wishin' you were there…huh?'I Miss the Ground' starts with a deeper pitched electric guitar echoing in that familiar way that Giancarlo creates mystery. Then, "I started all over again". And yes, the sound of the band has changed. There are the familiar waves of emotion which follow the guitars and keyboards, only this time more direct and somehow with more power. Erra's vocals are clearer than on past albums. Maitland's touch is different. The clashes and crashes shimmer more brilliantly than before.'Two Monkeys' opens with some beautiful trademark piano, surrounded by soft bass and soaring guitar, drifting off into the distance. Then Erra's vocals unfold the emotional and deep story of the two monkeys. "When I was young I believed there were two monkeys here". "Living in the trees between my arms and the sea". "Someone told me once that was their home". "But their life was sad because they were alone". The piano and keyboards are full of emotion. The writing and singing is…as always full of intense emotion. An even more powerful sounding version than the EP.'The Anger Song' opens with very interesting and unique guitar sounds. Then Maitland takes the stage to add his signature drum sound as the keys and guitars weave mystery around the soundscape. This track has an ever engulfing sound of waves of ocean and emotion which has always been a trademark of the band. It takes me back to "About Butterflies and Children", only this is the other side of happiness and bliss. If it is anger, it is soft anger, until Maitland picks it up a notch and drives louder as the waves of sound crash harder . The waves of guitar and keyboards crest and fall like waves, with Maitland adding the whitecaps to everything brilliantly.'Encounter', opens with wandering piano and drifting guitar chords mixed well with soft tapped drums. Giancarlo's voice enters, "I waited for you at the airport today. To hear what you wanted to say". The sad cello accompanying him brings out the full range of emotions filling the air. The keys surrounding, add mystery to this encounter.'She' is full of brilliant piano and soft tapping drums at the start. The excellent grinding electric guitar which enters with Maitland's drums and keys is sizzling white hot. Erra's vocals bring the emotion, reaching out to touch the subject of the story.'Wherever You Are' is full of more soft emotion and excellent acoustic guitar. Keys surround the mix, but not the waves from before, only soft cello – mixed symphonic keys providing a rich contrast to what has already been heard. Maitland's drums help pick up the pace and pour forth another helping of shimmering and solid sound.'Paralyzed', opens with more soft piano and soft electric guitar. That electric guitar later launches into full blast to pierce the sky and rain down cymbals full of glow. The guitar work on this track is some of the best on the album.'Afterthought', is full of some of the best piano on the album. It opens like the sunrise with soft piano crawling its way to your ears. Erra's vocals are at their peak and the bass, keyboards and drums deliver their best for this closer.This is a dreamy, surf riding wave album full of emotional undercurrents. Maitland's addition to the band has brought more highs and a more powerful drum delivery. The clarity which rains supreme on the mix of this new album points the compass in a new direction. The waves of guitar and keys fill the air and Erra's vocals are clearer and more emotional than on past albums. As always, this band performs as consummate professionals. No afterthoughts or worries on this album. It is another stellar performance. Don't miss this latest chapter in the story.The 2 disc edition of 'Afterthoughts', will include a DVD-A/DVD-V (NTSC 16:9, Region Free) version, with stereo and 5.1 surround high resolution 24bit / 96kHz mixes, plus DTS and Dolby Digital 5.1 surround versions. " - Sea of TranquilityNosound - Wherever You Are (from Afterthoughts) from Kscope on Vimeo.
    $15.00
  • Wild psychedelic album from this acoustic Peruvian ensemble.  I'm reminded quite a bit of the Polish ensemble Atman.  Totally mesmerizing."Before listening to this record, I strongly advise wearing headphones as the LP focuses heavily of sonic manipulation to give a rich, and immersive experience. To pick up on the detail and nuances contained within the record, headphones really are the only way to listen.Being a concept album (based upon a book written by one of the band members), Pilgrim to the Absolute melds the track listings with geographical locations to give the illusion that you, the listener, are in fact a pilgrim on a journey to an unknown location. In doing this, it makes for a relaxing and calming experience, reminiscent of a guided meditation or suchlike.The record kicks off with 'The Pilgrim Under Stars', and 8 minute opener that sets the tone and pace for the rest of the record. The track utilises several post-recording techniques such as added reverb, panning, drones, and I wouldn't be surprised to hear some of the environmental sounds such as the gushing river, or chirping birds, were added in after-the-fact also. The tracks starts off in a slow, nature-orientated ambience before slowly rising into a gentle crescendo, incorporating shakers, flutes, organ, and calm electric guitars.After this 'setting-of-the-scene', and putting you on the course of your journey, you come to The Woods. This Woods is a seemingly more sinister, or possibly more wild, environment than that of the stars with a blistering opening set of guitar phrases. A bongo beat then leads into a second, this time western-esque, crescendo. This latter crescendo being reminiscent of the musical scores which accompanied so many final-act duels in the golden era of cinema.The Shrine carries on much of the motifs contained within The Woods, using a consistent drum beat to create a canvas for playful flutes, violins, and chants to dance upon. However, The Source, the first single released from this new album, creates a somewhat different atmosphere with a chugging, delayed guitar riff. This electric guitar being an instrument not too commonly heard on Montibus Communitas' records. The riffage leads to almost trance of sorts, a call to the ritualistic Shaman drumming conducted within so many Native American and African tribes.Our last sonic stop before we reach The Absolute, and complete our journey, is The Light Masters. Going back to the effects used on the first track of the LP, we experience more post-recording elements such as panning, and ultra-sound. Cascading rhythmic shaking, and groaning warbles, give the track an odd tranquillity, evocative of some far-eastern temples of worship.Eventually, we reach the eponymous Source, completing our pilgrimage. This closing track lives up to its name by boasting an expansive sound, filled with reverberated bird calls, monastery-esque organ work, and airy flute passages. The organ's chords keep the return of the gurgling river in its place, and small, assorted chordophone phrases keep the track moving onwards.Critic's Comment: A conceptual album such as this could seem pretentious and needlessly lofty to those on the receiving end of this album's recommendation, but once you begin listening, and give yourself over to the unusual presentation of the record, Pilgrim to the Absolute is a thoroughly enjoyable listen. If you don't favour hard-hitting psychedelia that is always looking to grab you by the throat, then this could be an LP for you. Worthy of the title 'psychedelic', this is a record that can transport you away from your usual time and place, and into a foreign continuum." - Do You Even Psychedelic?
    $17.00
  • "HBC are guitarist Scott Henderson (Tribal Tech/Jean Luc Ponty/Elektric Band), bassist Jeff Berlin (Bruford/ABWH/Vox Humana/Passport/Allan Holdsworth/Kazumi Watanabe), and drummer Dennis Chambers (Santana/Mike Stern/Brecker Brothers/John Scofield/John McLaughlin/Niacin/Parliament/Funkadelic), three musicians who should be no strangers to anyone with a passing interest in jazz and jazz-rock fusion styles. The long list of legendary bands & artists that these guys have played with is staggering (see above for a very small sample), so you would have to image that this trio putting their skills together would make for some entertaining music right? The answer to that questions is a resounding YES!Henderson's bandmate in Tribal Tech, Scott Kinsey, is along for the ride here helping out with production and what sounds like the occasional keyboard coloring and solo (though he's not credited as such), in what turns out to be a wild recording for all involved. Hearing Scott's sizzling jazz & blues rock licks running circles around the equally trailblazing bass grooves from Berlin, all while Chambers' busy stick work keeps it all in check, is just a joy to experience. The menacing, muscular opener "Actual Proof" shows just what these three bring to the table, offering up sizzling leads from Henderson and Berlin's acrobatic lines on a song that's all about the interplay & soloing but yet the tune is melodic and memorable. Wayne Shorter's classic "Mysterious Traveller" is majestic and atmospheric, chock full of Berlin's gorgeous bass lines and Henderson's dramatic soloing, while another of Shorters tunes "Footprints" (yes, plenty of Weather Report related tunes being covered here) is given a quirky, fun treatment, as Chambers and Berlin lock into a serious groove while Henderson unleashes a flurry of blazing jazz solos and complex chords. Once again dipping into all things Weather Report, the trio cover Joe Zawinul's "D Flat Waltz", a rumbling, groove laden affair led by Berlin's uncanny Jaco Pastorius inspired fretwork. Another dip into the Zawinul songbook is "The Orphan", again with Berlin delivering some stunning, melodic lead bass lines that are just magnificent, floating above some tranquil keyboard washes that provide the perfect backdrop.Shorter's "Sightseeing" follows, and the band tears through this one with reckless abandon, as Berlin's walking bass line shimmers around Chambers' intricate fills & cymbal hits while Henderson unleashes a torrent of white hot shards of guitar mayhem. The trio delivers their first original song on the CD in the form of "Wayward Son Of Devil Boy", a blistering blues number featuring some scorching solos from Scott, and change gears for Berlin's piece "Threedom", a classical romp for the bassist to really show his dexterity on his instrument. The album closes out with a bombastic rendition of the Billy Cobham classic "Stratus", kicking off with Chambers' blazing intro and giving way to bubbling bass from Berlin and Henderson's raw, crunchy riffs and wild solos, as he seemingly pays homage to both Tommy Bolin and Jeff Beck. Listening to all three mixing it up at the finale is simply jaw dropping.As one would expect, this is musical fireworks from start to finish, as these three virtuosos come together and provide an hour's worth of musical excellence for all fusion fans to enjoy and cherish. Highly recommended!" - Sea Of Tranquility 
    $15.00
  • Not content with the 30th anniversary edition, Arista decided to come out with a more deluxe package 5 years later.  Now in a 2CD digipak, it features the album remastered, a second disc with 14 bonus tracks - 9 of which are previously unreleased.  It has a new 20 page booklet with rare photos and liner notes from Alan Parsons.
    $16.00
  • 2 DVD set documenting Klaus Schulze's collaboration with DCD vocalist Lisa Gerrard at the Night Of The Prog festival in Loreley on July 18, 2008. Disc One features the entire performance and the second disc is a documentary on Klaus Schulze and also includes an interview between Steven Wilson and Schulze.
    $16.00
  • Private vinyl edition released by the band.Second album from this great French ensemble. Curiously their first album was released by Tzadik and had to be the most overtly "prog" album ever on that label. This new album is out on Altrock and is probably my favorite release on the label. The band creates a mesmerizing whirlwind of sax, keys, vibes, bass, flue, bass, and drums. There is a touch of Zappa in the compositions probably due to the vibes/marimbas that remind of Ruth Underwood. Some sexy Mini-Moog leads squiggle around the dual sax leads. All in all one killer release. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • New edition of the excellent debut CD from this Italian "band" who's musical stylings are heavily influenced by Steven Wilson's various projects - the most obvious one being Blackfield. Another band that comes to mind would be Blow Up Hollywood. Nosound is essentially the work of Giancarlo Erra, a multi-instrumentalist. The music has a lush, dreamy feel with underpinnings of synth and Mellotron. You can feel yourself drifiting away, lost in an obscure movie sountrack. A beautiful and intelligent work."The audio CD will feature completely new digitally restored and analogue mastered audio from the original 2005 album, plus three extra re-mastered tracks (clocking in at 78 minutes of music!).

 The DVD features a brand new 10 minute video for Sol29, plus the original three ambient/experimental audio video tracks included on The World Is Outside DVD-R. As an extra for fans who missed the first release, the Kscope edition will also include all the original mixes of Sol29 as they were released on 2005 album version. This will be the final and official Sol29 release, collecting all the Nosound early studio material in one single release."
    $14.00