Art Metal

SKU: BARDO045
Label:
Bardo Records
Category:
Fusion/Jazz
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A long time in the making and well worth the wait. Art Metal is the new project put together by Jonas Hellborg and Mattias Eklundh (Freak Guitar). Originally conceived as a touring trio with Flower Kings drummer Zoltan Csörsz, Art Metal has evolved into something deeper. Brought on board are the Johansson Bros - Jens and Anders on keyboards and drums. An important component is the addition of Remember Shakti's Selvaganesh on kanjeera. The music of Art Metal demonstrates all of these musicians firing on all cylinders - crazed stunt guitar, not of this earth keyboard solos and a monster rhythm section. Quite of bit of the album bears Selvaganesh's imprint as the writing has an unmistakeable Indian feel. So you get this unusual and highly creative blend of fusion, metal and Indian influences coalesing into something great. A candidate for album of the year. Simply devastating.

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