Alice Cooper Goes To Hell ($5 SPECIAL)

"Following the success of his first solo album, Welcome to My Nightmare, Alice Cooper followed it up with another concept album, Goes to Hell, similar in style to its predecessor. Again, longtime Alice producer Bob Ezrin was on board, and while there are a few highlights, Goes to Hell signaled an Alice era where he pretty much forsook the raw garage rock of his early days (Killer, School's Out) in favor of polished studio glitz. That said, the title track is worthy of any headbanger's time (and remains one of Cooper's most overlooked rock tunes), while "I Never Cry" was another Alice ballad that found a place near the top of the charts. Other highlights include such tracks as the disco-rock-boogie of "You Gotta Dance" and the laid-back yet sinister funk groove of "I'm the Coolest." Elsewhere, the musical experiments aren't as successful -- the old-time sounds of "Give the Kid a Break," "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows," and the album-closing "Going Home" are about as far removed from the expected hard-rocking AC direction as you can get. And while the rocker "Wish You Were Here" would become a late-'70s concert standard for the Coop, the original studio version lacks the firepower the song achieved on the stage. Alice was supposed to follow up the album's release with another highly theatrical stage show (following the cue of his first solo tour in 1975), but an illness squashed the tour altogether. Despite its missteps, the gold-certified Goes to Hell would prove to be Alice's most commercially successful solo album for quite some time." - All Music Guide

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  • Limited edition digibook with 2 bonus tracks. Sabaton are a Swedish power metal band that has a peculiar fascination with war. All of their albums are built around military themes. These guys were a huge fan favorite at ProgPower USA.
    $13.00
  • "Equinox produced Styx's first single with A&M, the highly spirited "Lorelei," which found its way to number 27 on the charts. Although it was the only song to chart from Equinox, the album itself is a benchmark in the band's career since it includes an instrumental nature reminiscent of their early progressive years, yet hints toward a more commercial-sounding future in its lyrics. "Light Up" is a brilliant display of keyboard bubbliness, with De Young's vocals in full bloom, while "Lonely Child" and "Suite Madame Blue" show tighter songwriting and a slight drift toward radio amicability. Still harboring their synthesizer-led dramatics alongside Dennis De Young's exaggerated vocal approach, the material on Equinox was a firm precursor of what was to come . After Equinox, guitarist John Curulewski parted ways with the band, replaced by Tommy Shaw, who debuted on 1976's Crystal Ball album." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Out of print for some time, Bruce Soord freshed up the band's second album.  Originally released back in 2001, this version of 137 features a new mix, new mastering, and even new artwork.
    $13.00
  • "Alice Cooper wasted little time following up the breakthrough success of Love It to Death with another album released the same year, Killer. Again, producer Bob Ezrin was on board and helps the group solidify their heavy rock (yet wide-ranging) style even further. The band's stage show dealt with the macabre, and such disturbing tracks as "Dead Babies" and the title track fit in perfectly. Other songs were even more exceptional, such as the perennial barnstorming concert standard "Under My Wheels," the melodic yet gritty "Be My Lover," and the tribute to their fallen friend Jim Morrison, "Desperado." The long and winding "Halo of Flies" correctly hinted that the band would be tackling more complex song structures on future albums, while "You Drive Me Nervous" and "Yeah, Yeah, Yeah" showed that Alice Cooper hadn't completely abandoned their early garage rock direction. With Killer, they became one of the world's top rock bands and concert attractions; it rewarded them as being among the most notorious and misunderstood entertainers, thoroughly despised by grownups." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • NEW REMASTERED EDITION PACKED WITH BONUS TRACKS!!Highly Strung found former Darryl Way's Wolf drummer Ian Mosley on board and it was a big improvement. As was typical of Hackett's work at this point it was a bit uneven - the high points being extremely high with the pop bits not being nearly as successful. Regardless I can listen to him play guitar any time or any place. Remastered set includes three bonus tracks as well as interesting liner notes from Steve Hackett.
    $12.00
  • First time on CD for this brilliant album from 1980. Cybotron recorded three studio albums as well as a live official bootleg. The band hailed from Australia and were led by Steve Braund. Their musical roots were actually based in krautrock. They were heavily influenced by Tangerine Dream and Ash Ra Tempel. The differences were pretty dramatic actually. Implosion features wild synth flourishes, as well as an active rhythm section as well as sax. It has much more of a rock feel than the Tangs. When they go electronic it's heavily sequenced along the lines of Phaedra and Stratosfear. Great stuff actually. The booklet comes with detailed liner notes and photos and more importantly 25 minutes of unreleased material for their proposed next album that never materialized. A prog classic!
    $24.00
  • After a 10 year absence Enchant are back.  The band started in 1993 making them one of the earliest prog metal band.  Actually they are sort of an interesting band in that they seem to exist in both the prog rock and prog metal realms.  Some metal fans think of them as a bit lightweight and some prog rock fans think they are too heavy!  One thing is for sure they are wildly successful.  This is definitely prog but it never loses sight of the melody.  Fronted by the great Ted Leonard (who is now doing double duty with Spock's Beard) this one is a no-brainer - whether you are metal or prog head.  "irst impressions are the similarities to Spock’s Beard. Hardly surprising since Ted Leonard has been singing with them since 2011. He’s been with Enchant longer; their first CD came out in 1993. And familiarity doesn’t breed contempt here, fortunately.Bay area progressive rockers, they steer a straight course composing guitar-structured songs that they extemporise over. Guitarist Douglas A Ott is also the band’s main producer, with The Great Divide having been recorded at his own studio, but if in the past the band’s followed his direction they’re now more involved after a ten year gap working on other projects. Also, while integral, Ott doesn’t dominate Enchant’s sound but flows in and out adding a hard rock bias to their generic musical flavouring. Drummer/percussionist Sean Flanegan and bassist Ed Platt have the solidity of early Kansas and musically there are some pretty snazzy and often too brief keyboard solos from Bill Jenkins.A rolling cyclical bass line forms the basis of opening number ‘Circles’ with Leonard pondering life going round well, like a circle – while the lyrics aren’t profound they feel right and though this isn’t a concept album, despite the band stating otherwise, there are common themes concerning the human condition in a loosely existential manner. Mainly straight verse and choruses ‘Circles’ breaks out into more complicated time signatures before an acoustic comes to the fore, vocals return, an electric guitar take over and it concludes with a nicely warm keyboard solo. ‘Within An Inch’ follows with a steady rock backbeat over which Ott’s playing echoes Camel’s Andy Latimer interrupted briefly by some John Ellis punk-styled sirening. ‘The Great Divide’ follows suit in a more epic manner, the arrangement akin to Genesis in their golden period.Enchant don’t play with the fairies, despite what their name suggests. If anything they’re two steps removed from an AOR sound leaning in towards early Asia with some latter day Beatles thrown in, and a less grandiose take on Spock’s Beard. One might refer to them as technically proficient rather than emotionally overwrought, meaning there is a heartfelt flavour to their songs, and they tend to grow on you.The subdued opening to ‘Life In A Shadow’ throws a brief curveball echoing the Canterbury sound of Hatfield & The North before a heavy chorded chorus takes this into a rocking tune with soulful harmonies. ‘Deserve To Feel’ pours on the technical drumming and dribbling triplet bass figures with some flashy pyrotechnics predominantly on guitar but with keen keyboard flourishes, moving into a more intricate musical score as Jenkins and Ott trade inspired lines towards its conclusion. Likewise, ‘Here And Now’ builds reflectively moving towards emotional drama.Finely composed, played well, Enchant’s The Great Divide might not have you falling under its spell, but you may well be surprised how you find yourself being drawn to playing it." - The Midland Rocks
    $12.00
  • Limited edition comes with a bonus live DVD filmed in Melbourne, Australia."Karnivool, from day one, have made sure they are the kind of band who could do anything. From both a fan and industry perspective, the group has made it clear that anything should be expected and they will do whatever they want.While their second album, 'Sound Awake' didn't really spread its musical wings as much as the band claimed it would, their third record 'Asymmetry' certainly has. Those who may have jumped ship at the idea of more dragged out progressive rock will rejoice at the roller coaster ride the band offers on full-length number three.The bass heavy drum chaos that is opening track 'Nachash' is a tweak on the Karnivool sound, as if they were to remake 'Themata' today, with a refined, heavier sound that is simply bigger. This follows with a record stand-out, 'A.M. War', which is a little more math-rock musically, with the vocals opting to be less adventurous.That all changes on 'The Refusal', which is one of the heavier songs on the album, kicking off with gritty screamed vocals and thick guitar riffs. There is still a very atmospheric feel about the entire record much like on the previous release, songs like the seven minute 'Aeons' or the experimental title track, take their time and offer plenty of space within themselves for effected vocals or driving bass lines to shine through.The second half of the record changes things up again. It is mellower, more pop orientated and even at times reminiscent of front man Ian Kenny's other project Birds Of Tokyo. The latter half also lends itself to a little more experimentation, with the drum mess that is 'Amusia' and the creepy guitar number 'Float'.The band manage to channel bands like Tool and Porcupine Tree all in one for the huge closer 'Alpha', another highlight, thanks to its thematic changes, moving from a gentle piano laced opening to heavy riffs and chant style vocals.Karnivool sound like the band they want to be on 'Asymmetry,' a band that will keep you guessing for the entirety of a record and can move in any which way they like, while still making some form of sense." - Kill Your STereo
    $18.00
  • Many years ago Sieges Even recorded a live album that was never released (the band had dissolved). Now the band has two studio albums under their belt with the latest lineup it was time to finally give us a live disc. Playgrounds features material from Paramount, The Art Of Navigating The Stars, and A Sense Of Change (!!).
    $12.00
  • Limited edition double vinyl set.The Odyssey finds the band striking out in a new direction and frankly the results are stunning. Essentially the band made their statement album of neoclassical metal with the "V" release so there really was no point in going further. There is more agression in Russel Allen's voice and Mike Romeo's guitarwork is a crunch machine. This is progressive to the max - the 24 minute title track is a future classic and the sequel "Accolade II" lives up to the original. The overall production simply explodes - gone is the lush symphonics of "V" - this is right in your face. Mike Pinella's trademark blistering synth leads are all over the place and he trades off with Romeo just the way you want them to. What is missing is the symphonic landscapes that linked the different pieces together. I say...2003 is upon us...this new Symphony X is slightly different from the old Symphony X but just as good. Prog and power metal fans need not worry - they have delivered the goods with a surprising twist!
    $17.00
  • Well Opeth went and did it.  They gave prog rock fans the album they've been waiting for - the one that Heritage alluded to and came close to delivering.  Pale Communion is a full on prog album.  All clean vocals, tons of gorgeous keyboard sounds that will conjure up images of the 70s.  In fact if this album arrived with a Vertigo swirl on it I wouldn't have been surprised.  Some heavy riffing but no real metal elements within earshot.  The album was mixed by Steven Wilson and if anyone knows "the sound" its him.  By the way the album was recorded at Rockfield Studios which is holy ground for prog fans.  Prog rock album of the year?  You bet!  BUY OR DIE!!
    $29.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."Searching for a way to retool their sound, Judas Priest attempted to accentuate their melodic side on Turbo by incorporating synthesizers and '80s pop-metal stylings ("Wild Nights, Hot & Crazy Days" sounds more like Poison, albeit with synths). The restrained songcraft sometimes pays dividends, especially on the synth-driven leadoff track, "Turbo Lover," easily the best song on the record and a successful reimagining of the Priest formula. But often, the band simply sounds directionless, unsure of exactly which path to accessibility it should follow; moreover, the synth-guitar backing and overly polished production give the album an oddly mechanized, processed feel. It certainly doesn't help most of the material, which is often at least competent but rarely inspired enough to make much of an impression. That's unfortunate because Turbo's best moments indicate that with a clearer focus, the album could have been a creative success; however, it's overall Judas Priest's weakest release since Rocka Rolla." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Remastered edition of this star-studded first solo album comes with a bonus track.
    $17.00
  • "A vintage live recording from highly acclaimed prog rock band Greenslade in one of their final performances, packaged in a sleek digipak with extensive liner notes!Digitaly remastered to achieve a rich, clear sound, this concert album features highlights from the band’s latter career including “Bedside Manners Are Extra,” “Drum Folk” and more!“I listened with pleasure to the recordings. I’d forgotten how inventive and tight the band sounded. This recording is a real gem.” – Dave Greenslade"
    $14.00