2112 (CD/DVD)

SKU: B001747900-2
Label:
Mercury
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Long awaited 5.1 remix of the classic Rush album.  Here is what you get...

CD:

1. Remastered edition

2. 3 previously unreleased live tracks

DVD:

1. Video section has 5.1 and stereo remix in 24/48

2. Audio section has 5.1 and stereo mix in 24/96

3. Digital comic book, lyrics, liner notes and photo gallery

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  • Mindtech is a new Norwegian progressive metal band.  It's essentially a sister band to Tritonus, featuring Thor-Axel Ericksen (guitars) and Ole Devold (drums).  While Tritonus is old school prog metal, Mindtech is a bit more modern sounding.  Ericksen creates beds of staccato riffing and then unleashes blistering solos.  Vocalist Aslak Johnsen has a mid-range coarseness to his voice that fits this music very well.  Melodic but heavy - this is the good stuff.  Highly recommended. 
    $15.00
  • The madcap French jazz metal trio return with their sixth album.  Morglbl consists of guitarist Christope Godin, bassist Ivan Rougny, and drummer  Aurelian Ouzoulias.  The band has toured extensively around the world – USA, Europe, Russia and even China!  They have shared the stage with Liquid Tension Experiment, Bumblefoot, and Umphrey’s McGee among others.These three virtuosos are also well endorsed clinicians and have developed a following individually but when they come together the fireworks really start.  Tea Time For Punks doesn’t deviate from the tried and true Morglbl formula.  Take equal parts fusion and crushing metal power chords, then inject a healthy dose of tongue in cheek humor and you’ve got the perfect Morglbl album. The band is often described as Primus meets Steve Vai and Allan Holdsworth, with flavors of Frank Zappa! 
    $13.00
  • Great second album from this German underground band.  Trauma was a fine album, but the follow up features a revised lineup and a more mature sound.  The music definitely veered towards the harder side of the progressive spectrum.  Tracks are longer and concepts are more developed.  There seems to be a loosely tied Biblical theme going on.  The album has some beautiful organ work that owes more to Dave Sinclair than Jon Lord.  I do miss the flute/sax work but the guitarwork is subtle and sublime.  Conny Plank produced the album and tied the whole thing together.  One of the great titles from the Brain catalog.  Highly recommended.
    $19.00
  • Saw this band perform a couple of months ago and it was an incendiary set.  Goat are a Swedish psychedelic collective.  Their music is incredibly intense that has an African tribal feel - sort of like Black Sabbath meets Fela Kuti.  Twin guitar leads entwine over a propulsive and hypnotic rhythm section.  The band's two female vocalists sing in unison.  Washed in a sea of reverb their voices come across as one.  Love the beautiful fuzzed out guitar leads that juxtapose with the crystalline solos.  This is not late night listening.  This is invite your friends over, fire up a big phatty, and trance out.    BUY OR DIE!"When approaching the follow-up to a record as unilaterally praised and, on a personal level, so intoxicatingly enjoyable as Goat's 2012 debut World Music, all kinds of anxieties are inevitably thrown up regarding the new work's comparative merit. Which is why for this writer, on hearing how the psych journeymen chose to open their latest record Commune – with the ominous clang of a temple bell (like a theological inversion of the opener on Black Sabbath's debut) – it felt oddly apt, fateful almost. It was as if they knew I was scared to listen to the record; they responded by scaring me further with ecclesiastical percussion instruments.Goat should be given full credit for inspiring this sense of meaning and excitement; the album that follows is no stylistic leap forward for the band, yet it still exercises a deeply persuasive power over your head and hips. They largely stick to the heavy, kinetic, afro-influenced rock that proved such a winning formula, the only obvious developments being that the guitarists seem to be taking more cues from desert-rockers like Tamikrest and Tinariwen, and the songs show an increasing preference for subtlety over immediacy in the hooks department. Yet despite the apparent lack of new ideas here, the undeniable success of this work lies in Goat's deepening and development of the musical and spiritual themes presented on in World Music.And I'd go as far as to argue that Commune is very much a spiritually informed record. Whilst Goat hinted at a certain kind of gently cosmic, communal worldview via the obscure vocal samples on their debut, on this record their spiritual statement feels much more pronounced. Not only can this be seen in the song titles (opener 'Talk To God', 'The Light Within') and the appearance of more vocal samples ("There is only one meaning of life, and that is to be a positive force in the constant creation of evolution" – woah there!), but it's also evident in the production. Instruments are slathered in embalming-chamber reverb, ritualistic hand percussion is laced through almost every track, and the more laidback atmosphere means that instead of getting party-starting booty-shakers like 'Run To Your Mama' we get absorbing, contemplative grooves like the headspinning rhythms of 'Hide From The Sun' and 'Bondye', an instrumental track named after a voodoo deity which realises the trance-inducing implications of repetition. When Goat first emerged listeners may have been unsure about the sincerity of their transcendental allusions, and I for one suspected that their flirting with hippy ideologies was a self-conscious part of their selling point. However, with Commune, I'm now convinced this band genuinely have something to say. On tracks like 'Goatslaves' for example, you can actually make out quite easily what the vocalists are singing, and the message is direct: "Too many people living on their knees", yell the female voices over a stern, militant beat. "Dying of freedom, Dying of peace".There are some fuzz tones that are just so gnarly and righteous that they make you glad to be alive. Lots of guitarists nearly get there but there's no mistaking it when you hear that perfect analogue crunch. Tortured, writhing sound-buzzes so crusty and mangled that they sound as if the distortion pedal has been buried underground for six months, making a solo sound like it's trying to break free from the speakers. For me, the most successful examples of this sound include Dark on their album Round The Edges, almost anything by Swedish guitarist Reine Fiske and the almighty solo towards the end of 'Hi Babe' by Zamrockers Ngozi Family. A review of this record would be amiss if I failed to commend the absolutely stonking fuzzed-up guitar solo that hits halfway through 'Hide From The Sun', the album's lead single, which surely deserves a place in this illustrious canon. Nestling stylistically in a place between Omar Khorshid and Tony Iommi, it rips mercilessly through the track's disorienting metre, and may well encourage listeners to stare into the distance with a purposeful look on their face. Fans will be glad to hear that there are plenty more of those moments to be had with this album – see the taut, fidgety funk of 'The Light Within' and the pleasantly pastoral flute on 'To Travel The Path Unknown' amongst others.Goat stand out from the rest of the contemporary psych crowd as an undeniably modern, internet-age band in that they create their own successful and popular sound by synthesising a plethora of B-musics and fringe influences made easily available through the work of labels like Finders Keepers and Sublime Frequencies. Yet Commune is so much more than record-collector rock. Album closer 'Gathering Of The Ancient Tribes', in a stylistic echo of the first track 'Talk To God' features a lattice of Malian-sounding guitars offset against heavy bass and insistent beats, before dissipating into a haze of guitar noise, organ drone and that same meddlesome temple bell. It's details like this that prove Goat are clearly concerned with more than flogging a tasteful blend of trendy influences – Commune is a truly artistic statement." - THE QUIETUS 
    $14.00
  • "Chapter 1, the debut album from Level 10 is the first collaboration between vocal powerhouse Russell Allen (Symphony X, Adrenaline Mob) and bassist/producer/writer Mat Sinner (Primal Fear, Voodoo Circle) Frontiers President, Serafino Perugino initiated the duo to team up for the creation of a new Metal project which could melt the more contemporary sound of Adrenaline Mob with the more traditional European Power Metal melody and aggression.Sinner enlisted his Primal Fear/Voodoo Circle bandmates Randy Black (on drums) and Alex Beyrodt (on guitar) and Roland Grapow (ex Helloween, MasterPlan, Serious Black) and Alessandro Del Vecchio (Hardline, Voodoo Circle) to complete the lineup on lead guitar and keyboards respectively. On the songwriting side – besides the band members – the album features the songwriting talents of Magnus Karlsson, Carsten Schulz, Ralf Scheepers, Johann Fiegl, Sander Gommans and Amanda Somerville.For those fans of Russell Allen who were expecting Symphony X, you will be slightly disappointed, aside from Allen’s trademark pipes, there is not much here resemble Symphony X’s brand of neo-classical prog metal. By the same token, those fans of Allen who fear the agro-vocals and Godsmack-esque brand of “modern heavy rock”, can breathe easy, as the music on Chapter One leans closer to Euro power metal than mainstream hard rock.The album opener, Cry No More kicks off with a vengeance, with a guitar riff that would sound at home on one of Voodoo Circle albums. Allen’s vocals are powerful during the verses and soar on the multi-harmony chorus. Del Vecchio adds a 70’s moog synth sound on the keys and Black pounds the drums mercilessly. There is a crunchy, heavy groove on the mid-tempo Soul of the Warrior, featuring stellar vocal work on the chorus and a catchy as hell chorus. The tempo picks up with an 80’s sounding rocker with a driving beat, heavy chugging guitar rhythms, and Allen sounding aggressive while still maintaining his trademark melodic voice. The chorus features another killer multi-harmony vocal and Beyrodt and Grapow get to flex their muscles during the harmony guitar solo.The album takes a more AOR tone on the heavy rock anthem One Way Street, which has a 70’s Bad Company meets Motley Crue’s Dr. Feelgood feel to it. Randy Black’s percussion skills are on center stage, showing why Black is one of the most versatile drummers in power metal today. The albums first single titled Blasphemy has the symphonic bombast of European power metal and Allen’s voice is at it’s most evil sounding during the vocals and shows off his upper register during the chorus.Last Man On Earth is another hard rock song with a great hook and sing-a-long chorus, which does get a little repetitive after a few listens but I guess that’s what why they call it a hook! Scream And Shout is another old school power mental anthem straight out of the 80’s with it’s, for lack of a better word, *shout* a-long chorus. The guitar harmonies and shredding solo section blend in perfectly and Black’s double bass drumming drives the song once again.Allen flexes his vocal muscles on the mid-tempo rock of Into The Wilderness, using his upper register as only he can. The song itself isn’t as memorable as some of the other material on the album save for the chorus, which has some fine harmony vocal work. The requisite piano power ballad All Is Gone is a fitting showcase for Russell Allen’s amazing vocal prowess, even though the song itself sounds like a combination of Symphony X’s When All Hope Is Lost and something off of one of the Allen/Lande albums, which is not surprising since Magnus Karlsson is one of the credited songwriters here.The crushing riff of Demonized brings the heavy power metal with Russell at his most sinister sounding. For those fans wanting to hear something heavy, this one is for you. Chugging guitar rhythms, aggressive vocals, pounding drums, and shredding solos, this one has it all, a headbangers delight! The groove-heavy Soul Is Enternal has a mid-tempo fist pumping rhythm with Allen using a more soulful vocal approach during the verses and letting loose during the chorus.The album closer Forevermore is a power metal classic filled with melody, a HUGE multi-vocal harmony chorus and superb vocals from Allen and guest Ralf Scheepers vocals are quite noticeable in the mix. This song is probably the closest to the sound of Primal Fear and tied with Cry No More for my favorite song on the album. In an age where so-called supergroups are becoming more prevalent, Level 10’s debut album finds itself in the upper echelon, even if its destiny is to be a one off studio project, only time will tell." - Lady Obscure
    $14.00
  • "Some albums are immediate while others take a little longer to work their way into your subconscious. Blues rockers Kamchatka fell into the later category as, on first listen, I enjoyed ‘Long Road Made Of Gold’ but it was in a pile of stuff (If you can have such a thing as a digital pile) that was competing for my attention.  I’ve learnt over the years that the immediate album can burn out and fade away very quickly while the slow grower can stay with you for many years. This may well turn out to be the case as I find myself returning to the album on a regular basis, hence this belated review.‘Long Road Made Of Gold’’ is the sixth full length album from Kamchatka in a career that dates back over a decade. The Swedish power trio comprises Thomas ‘Juneor’ Andersson (guitar / vocals), Tobias Strandvik (drums) and bassist (Per Wilberg). Wilberg is best known for his time playing keyboards for  Metal act Opeth alongside stints in Spiritual Beggars and Candlemass which is pretty amazing as his bass work here is superb and very much an integral part of the Kamchatka sound. A rock trio will always require the rhythm section to stretch out and fill the sound when the guitarist takes a solo, if not; the result is empty dead air. Sonically the band draws on a range of influences with obvious power trio comparisons to Cream and The Jimi Hendrix Experience but mould this with a range of progressive and stoner influences. This range of influences found the band touring with highly respected blues / stoner act Clutch in Europe and the USA.Opener ‘Take Me Back Home’ throws the listener for an immediate loop with a banjo intro that leads into a heavy, intricate progressive blues workout blessed with a solid bottom end that brings to mind prime early Kings X. The complex ‘Made Of Gold’ is another winner with inventive musical dexterity as the song shifts 360 degrees for the solo section. The importance of the rhythm section I mentioned earlier is highlighted on ‘Rain’ where Wilberg steps up to double Andersson as the guitarist takes an extended solo. The quality of the musicianship might be lost without the clear warm production which was mixed and mastered by Russ Russell better known for extreme metal acts such as Napalm Death.The band seem equally happy with the infectiously catchy, both lyrically and musically, ‘Get Your Game On’ which was chosen as the first single from the album with its driving rhythm and short but sweet solo from Andersson. ‘Long Road’ shows yet another side of the band as Andersson adds slide guitar to the mix over rock solid, tribal drums from Strandvik with more than a little amusement to be had with the use of percussion.Kamchatka strove to make a record that owed much to their musical influences but was relevant in 2015 and with ‘Long Road Made Of Gold’ they have succeeded." - Red Guitar Music
    $12.00
  • MY BROTHER THE WIND is an improvisational cosmic rock collective consisting of members of widely known Swedish acts Makajodama, Magnolia, Animal Daydream and most notably Anekdoten, one of the more widely recognized names in the 1990s prog rock revival.Recorded live in the studio with no overdubs during a single day in January 2013, Once There Was A Time When Time And Space Were One captures the collective's progressive soundscape qualities with incredible analogue studio production. The band utilized 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, Mellotron, flute, bass, drums, congas and more to complete the task. Expect 45 minutes of the band's most succinct material to date, recorded deep in the snowy, forested, Swedish wilderness.In 2013, MBTW expanded into an even wider fanbase, having been invited to play the mighty Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, Holland, as well as at Duna Jam in Sardinia.  At the invitation of Opeth’s Mikael Okerfeldt, guitarist Nicklas Barker returned to Roadburn to perform an improv set with Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske.Those who frequent the works of Popol Vuh, Amon Duul, Sun Ra, Träd, Gräs Och Stenar, Albert Ayler, Ash Ra Tempel, Gong, Pink Floyd and other visionary, psychedelic rock artists are advised to investigate this act. "Lush and instrumental for its duration, My Brother the Wind‘s third full-length, Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One (released by Free Electric Sound/Laser’s Edge), rolls out of the speakers much easier than its title rolls off the tongue, though both title and the work itself satisfy rhythmically. The Swedish four-piece — they now seem to be a bass-less trio with Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten) and Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama) on electric/acoustic 12-strong guitar and Daniel Fridlund Brandt on drums, but Ronny Eriksson plays bass on the album — reportedly recorded live to two-inch tape on a vintage machine, and the passion they put in bleeds readily into the nine-song/45-minute outing, fleshed with liberal splashes of Mellotron courtesy of Barker to play up a ’70s prog feel in a piece like the 12-minute “Garden of Delights.” That’s hardly the only point at which those sensibilities emerge, but even more than that, the primary vibe here is one of gorgeous heavy psych exploration, the band adventuring and feeling their way through the material as they go.On peaceful moments like the title-track, which arrives as the penultimate movement before “Epilogue” leads the way back to reality — accordingly, “Prologue” brings us in at the start — that exploration is positively serene, the 12-string complemented by spacious electric tones spreading out across vast reaches, but Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One offers more than drone and psychedelic experiments. Subtly pushed forward by Brandt‘s drums, pieces like “Into the Cosmic Halo” and even “Epilogue” enact classic space rock thrust, and even “Song of Innocence Part 1,” the first part of the journey after the backward atmospherics of “Prologue” introduce, has some cosmic feel amid its echoing solos. Its subsequent complement, “Song of Innocence Part 2,” swells to life on an even more active roll, waves of amp noise up front while drums and bass groove out behind, waiting for the guitars to catch up, which they do in a suitably glorious payoff, relatively brief but masterfully engaging, setting a momentum that continues well into “Garden of Delights,” a focal point for more than its length.Because the songs flow so well one to the next, some directly bleeding, others giving a brief pause, and because later cuts like “Thomas Mera Gartz” — named in honor of the drummer for ’70s Swedish proggers Träd, Gräs och Stenar — and the title-track have a quieter take, it’s tempting to read some narrative into the shifts of Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One, but with the material not being premeditated, I’m not sure that’s the intention so much as a signal it’s well arranged. In any case, the album offers an immersive, resonant listen, with tonal richness to spare and the presence of mind to keep a sense of motion even in its stillest parts and a balance of organic elements — Danielsson‘s recorder and Brandt‘s percussion on “Misty Mountainside,” the 12-string, etc. — amid a wash of effects and swirling psychedelia. This attention to sonic detail makes Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One more than just a collection of jams, and adds further purpose to the already worthy cause of My Brother the Wind‘s thoughtful musings, wandering and not at all lost." - The Obelisk
    $13.00
  • The third album from Haken once again demonstrates why they are at the forefront of the progressive metal scene.  The first two albums Aquarius and Visions are quite different.  Aquarius is a much quirkier album - lots of twists and turns that kept you off balance through out.  It had more of a prog rock feel and some real oddball approaches that resulted in some reviewers referring to it as circus meteal.  Visions was quite different.  It was much more linear and clearly defined in terms of content.  It was a prog metal album and wonderful one at that.The Mountain is the first release for the band's new home at Inside Out.  The direction of the band takes a bit of a u-turn.  The music falls somewhere in between the first two.  There is a quirky, prog rock vibe but you get the heaviness and complexity of prog metal.  One particular track I keep going back to is "Cockroach King" which essentially pays homage to Gentle Giant's counterpoint vocals.  Regardless of which direction you preferred, The Mountain has enough diversity to go please everyone.If you want to keep track of where progressive metal is headed then climb the mountain - this is where its at.  Highly recommended.US jewel box edition with the same two bonus tracks included on the import digipak.
    $12.00
  • Once you start dig you never know what you will find.  Searching through the time capsule known as the Internet I stumbled across an album by Fred Taylor that was categorized as privately released fusion.  Fred Taylor is a drummer/percussionist based out of Seattle.  He self-released Court Of Circe in 1981.  While parts of the album definitely fit into the fusion realm quite a bit of it would be closer to modal jazz/kosmigroov.  The 14 minute two part title track shows off Taylor's skills as a drummer.  Other soloists on the album include keyboards, guitar and soprano sax.  Vinyl copies of this album are starting to skyrocket in price as more and more people find out about it.  Turns out that Taylor released this on CD back in 2004 and was more than happy to hook us up at a great price.  If your tastes run towards the jazzier side of fusion you should check this out."... Spokane drummer Fred Taylor... has produced a more interesting jazz record... Featuring a dozen local musicians, its production is crisp and full. Taylor. obviously an organizer, has managed to get these dozen locals to play his sensible, stretched-out arrangements very well. "Flutterby's Waltz" skips in and out of tempo and features Taylor's sensitive cymbal technique, an appropriately meandering soprano sax solo by Craig Lawrence, and a Hammond organ solo, an unusual touch." - Seattle Weekly 
    $9.00
  • Marco Iacobini is an Italian guitarist that frankly has been unknown to me until now.  Apparently his resume is quite extensive and he's played in Europe with some accomplished musicians.  This is his second album and a nice surprise at that.  This is purely fusion - no metal shredding going on.  Iacobini's songs have a melodic emphasis and his playing has some beautiful fluidity.  I'm reminded a bit of Joe Satriani and Steve Lukather.  He must either have a lot of disposable income or really have made a lot of friends - the other musicians on this album are pretty impressive.  Along for the ride are Tony Levin, Dave Weckl, Keith Carlock, Thomas Lang, Stuart Hamm, Billy Sheehan, Philippe Saisse, Carl Verheyen, Joel Taylor, Mike Terrana, Phil Maturano, Bill Bergman and others.  Definitely a lot of heavyweights in there.  Iacobini signed to Thomas Lang's label and I guess as an introduction they are making it available at a very reasonable price.
    $9.00
  • Autographed 4 song EP is a calling card for the upcoming full length release from this new band put together by Dave Kerzner (Sound Of Contact) and Heather Findlay (Mostly Autumn).  The music has more of a classic rock feel but Kerzner injects plenty of vintage keyboard sounds. 
    $13.00
  • "Led by Mark Peters, shoegaze misfits Engineers have been making brilliant records for nearly 10 years now, yet the limelight afforded to similar-sounding bands such as The Horrors has always eluded them. On 'Always Returning', their fourth album, they've delivered yet again. 'Bless The Painter', which spits at a social-media generation obsessed with photographing artworks for their news feeds rather than to admire their beauty, sets a glacial tempo. Centrepiece 'A Million Voices' is a driving, motorik synth masterpiece and 'Searched For Answers' shows subtle restraint, but the album slips up when it get too blissed out for its own good ('Drive Your Car'). Even so, it's about time this lot got the credit they deserve. " - NME
    $15.00
  • 1973's Mirage was the second album from this Chicago based kosmigroov ensemble that perpahs pushes the envelope a bit further.  Its a beautiful slice of spiritual jazz.  The formula is along the lines of  the first - a variety of horns supporting a locked in rhythm section and tons of electric piano.  They rachet it up a notch adding a touch of vocals which are essentially wordless and adds a cosmic dimension to the sound.  If you are a fan of Herbie Hancock's Mwandishi period you hear to hear this one.  Highly recommended to the adventurous.
    $18.00
  • “Tempo”, long waited new Osanna release with a 40 pages book with lots of photos and 2 DVD. Prog lovers will be captured by this work full of great music with a recent concert at Trianon Theatre in Naples with orchestra and archives material with rare 70s video footage.The book shows many pictures which tell Osanna Story with some photos from the 1st Osanna line up (Elio D’Anna, Danilo Rustici, Massimo Guarino, Lello Brandi) and a biography of the band written in Italian and English. The 2 DVD tell the history of the band from the first RAI video clips ‘til the recent live plays in Naples in 2012.First DVD “Live in Naples” has realised at the Trianon Theatre in Naples on 24 October 2012 during the presentation of  “Rosso Rock” album; a concert with some guests as: David Jackson, Sophya Baccini, Maurizio Capone, Elio Eco, Giampiero Ingrassia, Gianni Leone, Antonella Morea, Tito Schipa Jr., la Banda “Concerto Musicale Speranza” di Pino Ciccarelli e l’Orchestra d’archi “Rosso Rock” Ensemble” diretta da Gianluca Falasca.First half is more “electric” and Osanna plays with David Jackson, Gianni Leone and Sophya Baccini songs as: “‘A Zingara”, “Introduzione da YS” del Balletto di Bronzo, “Everybody’s gonna see you die”, In un vecchio cieco”, “Vado verso una meta” and “Theme One” (VDGG) to close first half of the gig.The second half start with a tribute to “Milano Calibro 9” movie directed by Fernando Di Leo, with the suite from the album “Preludio Tema Variazioni e Canzona” realised in 1972 with Luis Bacalov; Osanna plays with the “Rosso Rock Ensemble” Orchestra directed by Gianluca Falasca.Following some guests play with Osanna: Giampiero Ingrassia in “There will be time”, Tito Schipa Jr. “Per la Strada” (“Orfeo 9”) and “Fiume” (Landscape of Life), Antonella More, Maurizio Capone and Elio Eco in the final part of gig in “O Cuore e Napule” and “Fuje a chistu paese”.Second DVD “Story” : 20 video clip represent the story of the Band, some are from RAI Archives and there are also videos from Capodistria and some come from private archives. From 1971 to 2009 20 videos show different Osanna line up from time of RAI and TeleCapodistria ‘til recent videos in Naples and Savona. Many different “L’Uomo” versions presented by Renzo Arbore, Enrico Simonetti, Nino Fuscagni, Vanna Brosio and clips taken from “Speciale Tre Milioni”, “Domenica In”, “Amico Flauto”, “Adesso Musica”, “Tutto è Pop” etc.A really exclusive video is the one showing a Pop Festival in Naples “Be-In” (1973) where you can see some “prog” stars on stage...11 videos are taken from the 70s and 9 videos regarding Osanna from 2000 to 2009 including live at Mediterraneo Theatre in Naples in 2001 and live at Chiabrera Theatre in Savona in 2009 with David Jackson, Gianni Leone and Sophya Baccini.
    $33.00